↓ Skip to main content

Modern contraceptive use among migrant and non-migrant women in Kenya

Overview of attention for article published in Reproductive Health, June 2016
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
19 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
105 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Modern contraceptive use among migrant and non-migrant women in Kenya
Published in
Reproductive Health, June 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12978-016-0183-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rhoune Ochako, Ian Askew, Jerry Okal, John Oucho, Marleen Temmerman

Abstract

Manifest socio-economic differences are a trigger for internal migration in many sub-Saharan settings including Kenya. An interplay of the social, political and economic factors often lead to internal migration. Internal migration potentially has significant consequences on an individual's economic growth and on access to health services, however, there has been little research on these dynamics. In Kenya, where regional differentials in population growth and poverty reduction continue to be priorities in the post MDG development agenda, understanding the relationships between contraceptive use and internal migration is highly relevant. Using data from the 2008-09 Kenya Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), we analyze data from 5,905 women aged 15-49 years who reported being sexually active in the last 12 months prior to the survey. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regressions are fitted to predict correlates of contraceptive use in the presence of migration streams among other explanatory variables. Modern contraceptive use was significantly higher among women in all migration streams (non-migrant urban (OR = 2.8, p < 0.001), urban-urban (OR = 2.0, p < 0.001), urban-rural (OR = 2.0, p < 0.001), rural-urban (OR = 2.6, p < 0.001), rural-rural (OR = 1.7, p < 0.001), than non-migrant rural women. Women who internally migrate within Kenya, whether from rural to urban or between urban centres, were more likely to use modern contraception than non-migrant rural women. This phenomenon appears to be due to selection, adaption and disruption effects which are likely to promote use of modern contraceptives. Programmatically, the differentials in modern contraceptive use by the different migration streams should be considered when designing family planning programmes among migrant and non-migrant women.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 105 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 105 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 27 26%
Researcher 19 18%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 7%
Student > Bachelor 6 6%
Other 12 11%
Unknown 26 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 21 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 18 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 16 15%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 4 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 3%
Other 12 11%
Unknown 31 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 July 2017.
All research outputs
#6,829,278
of 11,414,199 outputs
Outputs from Reproductive Health
#513
of 679 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#138,903
of 276,431 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Reproductive Health
#28
of 39 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,414,199 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 679 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.6. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 276,431 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 39 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.