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Effect of household size on mental problems in children: results from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Psychology, June 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#37 of 517)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
twitter
18 tweeters

Citations

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16 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
62 Mendeley
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Title
Effect of household size on mental problems in children: results from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort study
Published in
BMC Psychology, June 2016
DOI 10.1186/s40359-016-0136-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bjørn Grinde, Kristian Tambs

Abstract

Most people in industrialized societies grow up in core (parents only) families with few if any siblings. Based on an evolutionary perspective, it may be argued that this environment reflects a mismatch, in that the tribal setting offered a larger number of close affiliates. The present project examined whether this mismatch may have a negative impact on mental health. We used data from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa), which includes 114 500 children. The mothers were recruited during pregnancy and followed up with questionnaires as the infants grew older. Correlates between number and type of people living in the household and questions probing mental health were corrected for likely confounders. The number of household members correlated with scores on good mental health at all ages tested (3, 5 and 8 years). The effects were distinct, highly significant, and present regardless of how mental issues were scored. The outcome could be attributed to having older siblings, rather than adults beyond parents. The more siblings, and the closer in age, the more pronounced was the effect. Living with a single mother did not make any difference compared to two parents. Girls were slightly more responsive to the presence of siblings than boys. Household pets did not have any appreciable impact. A large household is associated with fewer mental problems in children.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 18 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 62 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 62 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 14 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 10%
Student > Bachelor 6 10%
Researcher 5 8%
Other 11 18%
Unknown 11 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 13 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 8%
Social Sciences 4 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 6%
Other 11 18%
Unknown 18 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 40. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 November 2020.
All research outputs
#691,195
of 19,012,843 outputs
Outputs from BMC Psychology
#37
of 517 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#15,051
of 276,182 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Psychology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,012,843 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 517 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 20.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 276,182 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them