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Cross-talk between the Tissue Factor/coagulation factor VIIa complex and the tyrosine kinase receptor EphA2 in cancer

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Cancer, May 2016
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Title
Cross-talk between the Tissue Factor/coagulation factor VIIa complex and the tyrosine kinase receptor EphA2 in cancer
Published in
BMC Cancer, May 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12885-016-2375-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Oskar Eriksson, Åsa Thulin, Anna Asplund, Geeta Hegde, Sanjay Navani, Agneta Siegbahn

Abstract

Tissue Factor (TF) forms a proteolytically active complex together with coagulation factor VIIa (FVIIa) and functions as the trigger of blood coagulation or alternatively activates cell signaling. We recently described that EphA2 of the Eph tyrosine kinase receptor family is cleaved directly by the TF/FVIIa complex. The aim of the present study was to further characterize the cross-talk between TF/FVIIa and EphA2 using in vitro model systems and human cancer specimens. Cleavage and phosphorylation of EphA2 was studied by Western blot. Subcellular localization of TF and EphA2 was investigated by a proximity ligation assay and confocal microscopy. Phalloidin staining of the actin cytoskeleton was used to study cell rounding and retraction fiber formation. Expression of TF and EphA2 in human colorectal cancer specimens was examined by immunohistochemistry. TF and EphA2 co-localized constitutively in MDA-MB-231 cells, and addition of FVIIa resulted in cleavage of EphA2 by a PAR2-independent mechanism. Overexpression of TF in U251 glioblastoma cells lead to co-localization with EphA2 at the leading edge and FVIIa-dependent cleavage of EphA2. FVIIa potentiated ephrin-A1-induced cell rounding and retraction fiber formation in MDA-MB-231 cells through a RhoA/ROCK-dependent pathway that did not require PAR2-activation. TF and EphA2 were expressed in colorectal cancer specimens, and were significantly correlated. These results suggest that TF/FVIIa-EphA2 cross-talk might potentiate ligand-dependent EphA2 signaling in human cancers, and provide initial evidence that it is possible for this interaction to occur in vivo.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 4%
Unknown 23 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 25%
Student > Master 4 17%
Researcher 3 13%
Student > Bachelor 1 4%
Unspecified 1 4%
Other 2 8%
Unknown 7 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 13%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 8%
Unspecified 1 4%
Other 3 13%
Unknown 7 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 June 2016.
All research outputs
#6,796,922
of 7,847,043 outputs
Outputs from BMC Cancer
#2,751
of 3,368 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#224,431
of 269,354 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Cancer
#120
of 156 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 3,368 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.4. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 156 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.