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Exposure to common respiratory bacteria alters the airway epithelial response to subsequent viral infection

Overview of attention for article published in Respiratory Research, June 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (83rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
6 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
43 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
124 Mendeley
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Title
Exposure to common respiratory bacteria alters the airway epithelial response to subsequent viral infection
Published in
Respiratory Research, June 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12931-016-0382-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Carla Bellinghausen, Fahad Gulraiz, Alexandra C. A. Heinzmann, Mieke A. Dentener, Paul H. M. Savelkoul, Emiel F. Wouters, Gernot G. Rohde, Frank R. Stassen

Abstract

Colonization of the airways with potential pathogenic bacteria is observed in a number of chronic respiratory diseases, such as COPD or cystic fibrosis. Infections with respiratory viruses are known triggers of exacerbations of these diseases. We here investigated if pre-exposure to bacteria alters the response of lung epithelial cells to subsequent viral infection. Bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B cells and primary bronchial epithelial cells) were exposed to heat-inactivated Haemophilus influenzae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Streptococcus pneumoniae and subsequently infected with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), type 2 human adenovirus or influenza B. Levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, viral replication and expression of pattern recognition receptors were determined in culture supernatants and/or cell lysates. Exposure of BEAS-2B cells to H. influenzae before and during RSV-infection synergistically increased the release of IL-6 (increase above calculated additive effect at 72 h: 56 % ± 3 %, mean ± SEM) and IL-8 (53 % ± 12 %). This effect was sustained even when bacteria were washed away before viral infection and was neither associated with enhanced viral replication, nor linked to increased expression of key pattern recognition receptors. P. aeruginosa enhanced the release of inflammatory cytokines to a similar extent, yet only if bacteria were also present during viral infection. S. pneumoniae did not enhance RSV-induced cytokine release. Surprisingly, adenovirus infection significantly reduced IL-6 release in cells exposed to either of the three tested bacterial strains by on average more than 50 %. Infection with influenza B on the other hand did not affect cytokine production in BEAS-2B cells exposed to the different bacterial strains. Pre-exposure of epithelial cells to bacteria alters the response to subsequent viral infection depending on the types of pathogen involved. These findings highlight the complexity of microbiome interactions in the airways, possibly contributing to the susceptibility to exacerbations and the natural course of airway diseases.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 124 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Belgium 1 <1%
Unknown 123 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 26 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 24 19%
Student > Master 15 12%
Student > Bachelor 13 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 6%
Other 18 15%
Unknown 21 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 29 23%
Immunology and Microbiology 21 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 20 16%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 13 10%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 4 3%
Other 9 7%
Unknown 28 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 October 2020.
All research outputs
#2,492,087
of 19,019,810 outputs
Outputs from Respiratory Research
#293
of 2,361 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#45,620
of 276,234 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Respiratory Research
#1
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,019,810 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,361 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 276,234 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.