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Characterization of the neurohypophysial hormone gene loci in elephant shark and the Japanese lamprey: origin of the vertebrate neurohypophysial hormone genes

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, February 2009
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Title
Characterization of the neurohypophysial hormone gene loci in elephant shark and the Japanese lamprey: origin of the vertebrate neurohypophysial hormone genes
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, February 2009
DOI 10.1186/1471-2148-9-47
Pubmed ID
Authors

Pai-Chung Gwee, Boon-Hui Tay, Sydney Brenner, Byrappa Venkatesh

Abstract

Vasopressin and oxytocin are mammalian neurohypophysial hormones with distinct functions. Vasopressin is involved mainly in osmoregulation and oxytocin is involved primarily in parturition and lactation. Jawed vertebrates contain at least one homolog each of vasopressin and oxytocin, whereas only a vasopressin-family hormone, vasotocin, has been identified in jawless vertebrates. The genes encoding vasopressin and oxytocin are closely linked tail-to-tail in eutherian mammals whereas their homologs in chicken, Xenopus and coelacanth (vasotocin and mesotocin) are linked tail-to-head. In contrast, their pufferfish homologs, vasotocin and isotocin, are located on the same strand of DNA with isotocin located upstream of vasotocin and separated by five genes. These differences in the arrangement of the two genes in different bony vertebrate lineages raise questions about their origin and ancestral arrangement. To trace the origin of these genes, we have sequenced BAC clones from the neurohypophysial gene loci in a cartilaginous fish, the elephant shark (Callorhinchus milii), and in a jawless vertebrate, the Japanese lamprey (Lethenteron japonicum). We have also analyzed the neurohypophysial hormone gene locus in an invertebrate chordate, the amphioxus (Branchiostoma floridae).

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 56 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Sweden 1 2%
Germany 1 2%
Brazil 1 2%
Unknown 52 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 11 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 16%
Student > Bachelor 8 14%
Student > Master 8 14%
Professor 5 9%
Other 11 20%
Unknown 4 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 34 61%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 11%
Neuroscience 4 7%
Psychology 3 5%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 4%
Other 2 4%
Unknown 5 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 July 2012.
All research outputs
#9,906,245
of 12,373,386 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#2,059
of 2,341 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#86,603
of 120,993 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#30
of 37 outputs
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We're also able to compare this research output to 37 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 10th percentile – i.e., 10% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.