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The Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement and health: few gains, some losses, many risks

Overview of attention for article published in Globalization and Health, June 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (84th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
14 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
13 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
58 Mendeley
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Title
The Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement and health: few gains, some losses, many risks
Published in
Globalization and Health, June 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12992-016-0166-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ronald Labonté, Ashley Schram, Arne Ruckert

Abstract

In early October 2015, 12 nations signed the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPPA), promoted as a model '21(st) century' trade and investment agreement that other countries would eventually join. There are growing concerns amongst the public health community about the potential health implications of such WTO+ trade and investment agreements, but little existing knowledge on their potential health impacts. We conducted a health impact review which allows for a summary estimation of the most significant health impacts of a set of policies, in our case the TPPA. Our analysis shows that there are a number of potentially serious health risks, with the following key pathways linking trade to health: access to medicines, reduced regulatory space, investor-state dispute settlement (ISDS), and environmental protection and labor rights. We also note that economic gains that could translate into health benefits will likely be inequitably distributed. Our analysis demonstrates the need for the public health community to be knowledgeable about trade issues and more engaged in trade negotiations. In the context of the COP21 climate change Agreement, and the UN Sustainable Development Goals, this may be an opportune time for TPPA countries to reject it as drafted, and rethink what should be the purpose of such agreements in light of (still) escalating global wealth inequalities and fragile environmental resources-the two most foundational elements to global health equity.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 14 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 58 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 58 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 12 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 14%
Researcher 6 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 9%
Student > Bachelor 4 7%
Other 13 22%
Unknown 10 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 9 16%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 14%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 7 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 9%
Business, Management and Accounting 4 7%
Other 13 22%
Unknown 12 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 23. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 October 2017.
All research outputs
#563,791
of 12,056,897 outputs
Outputs from Globalization and Health
#80
of 612 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#21,423
of 278,260 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Globalization and Health
#4
of 25 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,056,897 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 612 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 278,260 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 25 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.