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Does wine glass size influence sales for on-site consumption? A multiple treatment reversal design

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, June 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#4 of 12,541)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
168 news outlets
blogs
11 blogs
twitter
129 tweeters
facebook
9 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
26 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
47 Mendeley
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Title
Does wine glass size influence sales for on-site consumption? A multiple treatment reversal design
Published in
BMC Public Health, June 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-3068-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rachel Pechey, Dominique-Laurent Couturier, Gareth J. Hollands, Eleni Mantzari, Marcus R. Munafò, Theresa M. Marteau

Abstract

Wine glass size can influence both perceptions of portion size and the amount poured, but its impact upon purchasing and consumption is unknown. This study aimed to examine the impact of wine glass size on wine sales for on-site consumption, keeping portion size constant. In one establishment (with separate bar and restaurant areas) in Cambridge, England, wine glass size (Standard; Larger; Smaller) was changed over eight fortnightly periods. The bar and restaurant differ in wine sales by the glass vs. by the bottle (93 % vs. 63 % by the glass respectively). Daily wine volume purchased was 9.4 % (95 % CI: 1.9, 17.5) higher when sold in larger compared to standard-sized glasses. This effect seemed principally driven by sales in the bar area (bar: 14.4 % [3.3, 26.7]; restaurant: 8.2 % [-2.5, 20.1]). Findings were inconclusive as to whether sales were different with smaller vs. standard-sized glasses. The size of glasses in which wine is sold, keeping the portion size constant, can affect consumption, with larger glasses increasing consumption. The hypothesised mechanisms for these differential effects need to be tested in a replication study. If replicated, policy implications could include considering glass size amongst alcohol licensing requirements. ISRCTN registry: ISRCTN12018175 . Registered 12(th) May 2015.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 129 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 47 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Mexico 1 2%
Denmark 1 2%
Unknown 45 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 26%
Student > Master 11 23%
Researcher 6 13%
Student > Postgraduate 3 6%
Professor 3 6%
Other 5 11%
Unknown 7 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 16 34%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 15%
Social Sciences 3 6%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 4%
Design 2 4%
Other 7 15%
Unknown 10 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1481. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 October 2018.
All research outputs
#4,639
of 18,953,852 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#4
of 12,541 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#77
of 275,536 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,953,852 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 12,541 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,536 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them