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Early changes within the lymphocyte population are associated with the development of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome in trauma patients

Overview of attention for article published in Critical Care, January 2016
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (82nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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38 tweeters

Citations

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28 Dimensions

Readers on

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49 Mendeley
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Title
Early changes within the lymphocyte population are associated with the development of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome in trauma patients
Published in
Critical Care, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13054-016-1341-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Joanna Manson, Elaine Cole, Henry D. De’Ath, Paul Vulliamy, Ute Meier, Dan Pennington, Karim Brohi, Manson, Joanna, Cole, Elaine, De'Ath, Henry D, Vulliamy, Paul, Meier, Ute, Pennington, Dan, Brohi, Karim

Abstract

Early survival following severe injury has been improved with refined resuscitation strategies. Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) is common among this fragile group of patients leading to prolonged hospital stay and late mortality. MODS after trauma is widely attributed to dysregulated inflammation but the precise mechanics of this response and its influence on organ injury are incompletely understood. This study was conducted to investigate the relationship between early lymphocyte responses and the development of MODS during admission. During a 24-month period, trauma patients were recruited from an urban major trauma centre to an ongoing, observational cohort study. Admission blood samples were obtained within 2 h of injury and before in-hospital intervention, including blood transfusion. The study population was predominantly male with a blunt mechanism of injury. Lymphocyte subset populations including T helper, cytotoxic T cells, NK cells and γδ T cells were identified using flow cytometry. Early cytokine release and lymphocyte count during the first 7 days of admission were also examined. This study demonstrated that trauma patients who developed MODS had an increased population of NK dim cells (MODS vs no MODS: 22 % vs 13 %, p < 0.01) and reduced γδ-low T cells (MODS vs no MODS: 0.02 (0.01-0.03) vs 0.09 (0.06-0.12) × 10^9/L, p < 0.01) at admission. Critically injured patients who developed MODS (n = 27) had higher interferon gamma (IFN-γ) concentrations at admission, compared with patients of matched injury severity and shock (n = 60) who did not develop MODS (MODS vs no MODS: 4.1 (1.8-9.0) vs 1.0 (0.6-1.8) pg/ml, p = 0.01). Lymphopenia was observed within 24 h of injury and was persistent in those who developed MODS. Patients with a lymphocyte count of 0.5 × 10(9)/L or less at 48 h, had a 45 % mortality rate. This study provides evidence of lymphocyte activation within 2 h of injury, as demonstrated by increased NK dim cells, reduced γδ-low T lymphocytes and high blood IFN-γ concentration. These changes are associated with the development of MODS and lymphopenia. The study reveals new opportunities for investigation to characterise the cellular response to trauma and examine its influence on recovery.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 38 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 49 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Mexico 1 2%
Unknown 48 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 20%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 10%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 8%
Student > Master 4 8%
Researcher 4 8%
Other 10 20%
Unknown 12 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 22 45%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 8%
Engineering 2 4%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 2%
Computer Science 1 2%
Other 4 8%
Unknown 15 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 26. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 January 2018.
All research outputs
#1,010,005
of 18,880,385 outputs
Outputs from Critical Care
#931
of 5,527 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#20,761
of 275,106 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Critical Care
#10
of 57 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,880,385 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,527 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 17.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,106 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 57 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.