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Staphylococcus epidermidis pan-genome sequence analysis reveals diversity of skin commensal and hospital infection-associated isolates

Overview of attention for article published in Genome Biology (Online Edition), January 2012
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Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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133 Dimensions

Readers on

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215 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
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Title
Staphylococcus epidermidis pan-genome sequence analysis reveals diversity of skin commensal and hospital infection-associated isolates
Published in
Genome Biology (Online Edition), January 2012
DOI 10.1186/gb-2012-13-7-r64
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sean Conlan, Lilia A Mijares, Jesse Becker, Robert W Blakesley, Gerard G Bouffard, Shelise Brooks, Holly Coleman, Jyoti Gupta, Natalie Gurson, Morgan Park, Brian Schmidt, Pamela J Thomas, Michael Otto, Heidi H Kong, Patrick R Murray, Julia A Segre

Abstract

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: While Staphylococcus epidermidis is commonly isolated from healthy human skin, it is also the most frequent cause of nosocomial infections on indwelling medical devices. Despite its importance, few genome sequences existed and the most frequent hospital-associated lineage, ST2, had not been fully sequenced. RESULTS: We cultivated 71 commensal S. epidermidis isolates from 15 skin sites and compared them with 28 nosocomial isolates from venous catheters and blood cultures. We produced 21 commensal and 9 nosocomial draft genomes, and annotated and compared their gene content, phylogenetic relatedness and biochemical functions. The commensal strains had an open pan-genome with 80% core genes and 20% variable genes. The variable genome was characterized by an overabundance of transposable elements, transcription factors and transporters. Biochemical diversity, as assayed by antibiotic resistance and in vitro biofilm formation, demonstrated the varied phenotypic consequences of this genomic diversity. The nosocomial isolates exhibited both large-scale rearrangements and single-nucleotide variation. We showed that S. epidermidis genomes separate into two phylogenetic groups, one consisting only of commensals. The formate dehydrogenase gene, present only in commensals, is a discriminatory marker between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: Commensal skin S. epidermidis have an open pan-genome and show considerable diversity between isolates, even when derived from a single individual or body site. For ST2, the most common nosocomial lineage, we detect variation between three independent isolates sequenced. Finally, phylogenetic analyses revealed a previously unrecognized group of S. epidermidis strains characterized by reduced virulence and formate dehydrogenase, which we propose as a clinical molecular marker.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 215 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 2%
United Kingdom 2 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Russia 1 <1%
Denmark 1 <1%
Unknown 204 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 46 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 43 20%
Student > Bachelor 32 15%
Student > Master 19 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 5%
Other 34 16%
Unknown 30 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 74 34%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 36 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 26 12%
Immunology and Microbiology 24 11%
Engineering 5 2%
Other 17 8%
Unknown 33 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 July 2012.
All research outputs
#13,324,772
of 21,334,388 outputs
Outputs from Genome Biology (Online Edition)
#3,595
of 4,004 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#82,270
of 143,083 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Genome Biology (Online Edition)
#5
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,334,388 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,004 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 27.3. This one is in the 9th percentile – i.e., 9% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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