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Response of C57Bl/6 mice to a carbohydrate-free diet

Overview of attention for article published in Nutrition & Metabolism, January 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
6 news outlets
twitter
81 tweeters
facebook
7 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
29 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
77 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Response of C57Bl/6 mice to a carbohydrate-free diet
Published in
Nutrition & Metabolism, January 2012
DOI 10.1186/1743-7075-9-69
Pubmed ID
Authors

Saihan Borghjid, Richard Feinman

Abstract

High fat feeding in rodents generally leads to obesity and insulin resistance whereas in humans this is only seen if dietary carbohydrate is also high, the result of the anabolic effect of poor regulation of glucose and insulin. A previous study of C57Bl/6 mice (Kennedy AR, et al.: Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab (2007) 262 E1724-1739) appeared to show the kind of beneficial effects of calorie restriction that is seen in humans but that diet was unusually low in protein (5%). In the current study, we tested a zero-carbohydrate diet that had a higher protein content (20%). Mice on the zero-carbohydrate diet, despite similar caloric intake, consistently gained more weight than animals consuming standard chow, attaining a dramatic difference by week 16 (46.1 ± 1.38 g vs. 30.4 ± 1.00 g for the chow group). Consistent with the obese phenotype, experimental mice had fatty livers and hearts as well as large fat deposits in the abdomino-pelvic cavity, and showed impaired glucose clearance after intraperitoneal injection. In sum, the response of mice to a carbohydrate-free diet was greater weight gain and metabolic disruptions in distinction to the response in humans where low carbohydrate diets cause greater weight loss than isocaloric controls. The results suggest that rodent models of obesity may be most valuable in the understanding of how metabolic mechanisms can work in ways different from the effect in humans.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 81 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 77 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
New Zealand 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Netherlands 1 1%
Unknown 74 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 17%
Student > Master 13 17%
Student > Bachelor 12 16%
Researcher 12 16%
Other 5 6%
Other 14 18%
Unknown 8 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 21 27%
Medicine and Dentistry 17 22%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 5%
Business, Management and Accounting 3 4%
Other 9 12%
Unknown 15 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 105. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 October 2022.
All research outputs
#327,828
of 22,512,774 outputs
Outputs from Nutrition & Metabolism
#54
of 940 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,058
of 255,567 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nutrition & Metabolism
#7
of 74 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,512,774 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 940 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 25.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 255,567 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 74 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.