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Definition by FSH, AMH and embryo numbers of good-, intermediate- and poor-prognosis patients suggests previously unknown IVF outcome-determining factor associated with AMH

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Translational Medicine, June 2016
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Title
Definition by FSH, AMH and embryo numbers of good-, intermediate- and poor-prognosis patients suggests previously unknown IVF outcome-determining factor associated with AMH
Published in
Journal of Translational Medicine, June 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12967-016-0924-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Norbert Gleicher, Vitaly A. Kushnir, Aritro Sen, Sarah K. Darmon, Andrea Weghofer, Yan-Guang Wu, Qi Wang, Lin Zhang, David F. Albertini, David H. Barad

Abstract

Though outcome models have been proposed previously, it is unknown whether cutoffs in clinical pregnancy and live birth rates at all ages are able to classify in vitro fertilization (IVF) patients into good-, intermediate- and poor prognosis. We here in 3 infertile patient cohorts, involving 1247, 1514 and 632 women, built logistic regression models based on 3 functional ovarian reserve (FOR) parameters, including (1) number of good quality embryos, (2) follicle stimulating hormone (FSH, mIU/mL) and (3) anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH, ng/mL), determining whether clinical pregnancy and live birth rates can discriminate between good, intermediate and poor prognosis patients. All models, indeed, allowed at all ages for separation by prognosis, though cut offs changed with age. In the embryo model, increasing embryo production resulted in linear improvement of IVF outcomes despite transfer of similar embryo numbers; in the FSH model outcomes and FSH levels related inversely, while the association of AMH followed a bell-shaped polynomial pattern, demonstrating "best" outcomes at mid-ranges. All 3 models demonstrated increasingly poor outcomes with advancing ages, though "best" AMH even above age 43 was still associated with unexpectedly good pregnancy and delivery outcomes. Excessively high AMH, in contrast, was at all ages associated with spiking miscarriage rates. At varying peripheral serum concentrations, AMH, thus, demonstrates hithero unknown and contradictory effects on IVF outcomes, deserving at different concentrations investigation as a potential therapeutic agent, with pregnancy-supporting and pregnancy-interrupting properties.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 26 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Poland 1 4%
Australia 1 4%
Unknown 24 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 19%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 12%
Researcher 3 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 12%
Other 2 8%
Other 5 19%
Unknown 5 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 13 50%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 4%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 4%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 4%
Psychology 1 4%
Other 3 12%
Unknown 6 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 June 2016.
All research outputs
#4,129,482
of 7,879,571 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Translational Medicine
#1,004
of 1,784 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#145,448
of 268,520 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Translational Medicine
#70
of 116 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,879,571 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,784 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.6. This one is in the 12th percentile – i.e., 12% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,520 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 116 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.