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Total body irradiation—an attachment free sweeping beam technique

Overview of attention for article published in Radiation Oncology, June 2016
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2 tweeters

Citations

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9 Dimensions

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29 Mendeley
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Title
Total body irradiation—an attachment free sweeping beam technique
Published in
Radiation Oncology, June 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13014-016-0658-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Petra M. Härtl, Marius Treutwein, Matthias G. Hautmann, Manuel März, Fabian Pohl, Oliver Kölbl, Barbara Dobler

Abstract

A sweeping beam technique for total body irradiation in standard treatment rooms and for standard linear accelerators (linacs) is introduced, which does not require any accessory attached to the linac. Lung shielding is facilitated to reduce the risk of pulmonary toxicity. Additionally, the applicability of a commercial radiotherapy planning system (RTPS) is examined. The patient is positioned on a low couch on the floor, the longitudinal axis of the body in the rotational plane of the linac. Eight arc fields and five additional fixed beams are applied to the patient in supine and prone position respectively. The dose distributions were measured in a solid water phantom and in an Alderson phantom. Diode detectors were calibrated for in-vivo dosimetry. The RTPS Oncentra was employed for calculations of the dose distribution. For the cranial 120 cm the longitudinal dose profile in a slab phantom measured with ionization chamber varies between 94 and 107 % of the prescription dose. These values were confirmed by film measurements and RTPS calculations. The transmittance of the lung shields has been determined as a function of the thickness of the absorber material. Measurements in an Alderson phantom and in-vivo dosimetry of the first patients match the calculated dose. A treatment technique with clinically good dose distributions has been introduced, which can be applied with each standard linac and in standard treatment rooms. Dose calculations were performed with a commercial RTPS and should enable individual dose optimization.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 29 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 29 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 7 24%
Student > Master 5 17%
Other 4 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 14%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 7%
Other 2 7%
Unknown 5 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Physics and Astronomy 9 31%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 28%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 10%
Psychology 1 3%
Unknown 8 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 June 2016.
All research outputs
#13,245,850
of 16,669,654 outputs
Outputs from Radiation Oncology
#1,200
of 1,676 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#188,435
of 269,256 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Radiation Oncology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,669,654 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,676 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.5. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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