↓ Skip to main content

Interpretation of sonotubometric data based on phase-shift detection

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery, June 2016
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
2 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
10 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Interpretation of sonotubometric data based on phase-shift detection
Published in
Journal of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery, June 2016
DOI 10.1186/s40463-016-0151-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yaw Amoako-Tuffour, Philip Garland, Manohar Bance

Abstract

Sonotubometry is a non-invasive means of assessing Eustachian tube (ET) function. Its interpretation remains a complex task with questionable results due to wide variation between trials. A study was conducted to ascertain whether the measurement of phase shift in sonotubometric signals would be a more reliable indicator of ET patency than fluctuating Sound Pressure Level (SPL). The ears of six healthy participants and two participants with patulous ET (PET) were probed with a 100 Hz signal. Five recordings of SPL were performed at the external auditory canal. Cross-correlation was performed among filtered SPL signals and among extracted phase shift waveforms. Peak coefficients were averaged to provide a measure of waveform similarity between trials. Mean peak cross correlation coefficient for SPL signal measured 0.603 ± 0.057 Standard Error of Mean (SEM) whilst that for Phase-Shift signal measured 0.884 ± 0.027 (SEM). All normal participants demonstrated an observable phase change between the ear and nasal signal during swallowing indicating an acoustic impedance change during the event. For the PET patients tested, the phase measurements in ear and nasal signals follow one another reasonably closely, indicating little or no impedance change during swallowing. It is thought that this impedance change is indicative of opening of the ET in normal patients, and the lack impedance change indicates ET either remaining open or remaining closed throughout the swallow. Experimental data suggest that phase-shift detection is a more consistent means of interpreting sonotubometric data than SPL analysis.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 10 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 10 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 2 20%
Student > Bachelor 2 20%
Other 1 10%
Researcher 1 10%
Student > Postgraduate 1 10%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 3 30%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 4 40%
Psychology 1 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 10%
Unknown 4 40%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 June 2016.
All research outputs
#6,828,279
of 7,885,400 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery
#167
of 194 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#223,515
of 268,043 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery
#4
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,885,400 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 194 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 1.7. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,043 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 4 of them.