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Disentangling the concept of “the complex older patient” in general practice: a qualitative study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Family Practice, June 2016
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (56th percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters

Citations

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8 Dimensions

Readers on

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39 Mendeley
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Title
Disentangling the concept of “the complex older patient” in general practice: a qualitative study
Published in
BMC Family Practice, June 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12875-016-0455-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

S. A. Zwijsen, N. M. Nieuwenhuizen, O. R. Maarsingh, M. F. I. A. Depla, C. M. P. M. Hertogh

Abstract

The rising life expectancy in the developed world leads to an increase in the number of older patients and the complexity of their complaints in general practice. Although interventions and support for general practitioners are available, implementation lags. Knowledge on what determines a complex older patient, the problems of which general practitioners encounter and the situations they actually need support for, is necessary for better implementation. To provide support to general practitioners in their struggle with complex older patients, the aim of this research was to disentangle the concept of the complex older patient in general practice. A qualitative approach was used consisting of 15 semi-structured interviews with general practitioners. The general practitioner was asked to prepare a case of a complex older patient out of their own practice that could be discussed during the interview. Transcripts of the interview were analysed using inductive thematic analysis. Analysis of the interviews resulted in twelve themes that could be categorised into five factors that contribute to the complexity of cases of older patients. The five factors are: not being in charge, different views on necessary care, encountering the boundaries of medicine, limits to providing social care, ill-equipped. The factors that were found imply that a better organisational structure for elderly care and consulting elderly care physicians could support general practitioners in providing care for older complex patients. Furthermore, understanding the current concept of patient autonomy seems unjustified in cases of complex older patients.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 39 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 39 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 11 28%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 15%
Researcher 5 13%
Student > Master 4 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 5%
Other 2 5%
Unknown 9 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 18%
Social Sciences 6 15%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 10%
Philosophy 2 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 5%
Other 9 23%
Unknown 9 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 June 2016.
All research outputs
#10,849,343
of 19,541,023 outputs
Outputs from BMC Family Practice
#939
of 1,826 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#118,432
of 277,343 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Family Practice
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,541,023 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,826 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.2. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 277,343 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them