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Reduced long-term memory in a rat model of 8 minutes ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest: a pilot trial

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Veterinary Research, June 2016
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Title
Reduced long-term memory in a rat model of 8 minutes ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest: a pilot trial
Published in
BMC Veterinary Research, June 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12917-016-0740-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Wolfgang Weihs, Alexandra-M Warenits, Florian Ettl, Ingrid A. M. Magnet, Ursula Teubenbacher, Andreas Hilpold, Andreas Schober, Christoph Testori, Akos Tiboldi, Katharina Tillmann Mag, Michael Holzer, Sandra Hoegler, Andreas Janata, Fritz Sterz

Abstract

Evaluating beneficial effects of potential protective therapies following cardiac arrest in rodent models could be enhanced by exploring behavior and cognitive functions. The Morris Water Maze is a well-known cognitive paradigm to test spatial learning and memory. Behavioral testing with the Morris Water Maze in Sprague-Dawley rats (300 ± 25 g) resuscitated after 8 min of ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest was carried out 5 and 12 weeks after cardiac arrest (CA) and compared to results of naïve rats (CONTROL). At 5 weeks, within each group latency time to reach the hidden platform (reflecting spatial learning) decreased equally from day 1 to 4 (CA: 105.6 ± 8.2 vs. 8.9 ± 1.2 s, p < 0.001; 75.5 ± 13.2 vs. 17.1 ± 4.5, p < 0.001) with no differences between groups (p = 0.138). In the probe trial 24 h after the last trial, time spent in the target sector (reflecting memory recall) within each group was significantly longer (CA: 25 ± 1.3; 24.7 ± 2.5 s) than in each of the three other sectors (CA: 7.7 ± 0.7, 14.3 ± 2.5, 8.4 ± 0.8 and 7.8 ± 1.2, 11.7 ± 1.5, 10.3 ± 1.6 s) but with no significantly differences between groups. Seven days later (reflecting memory retention), control group animals remained significantly longer in the target sector compared to every other sector, whereas the cardiac arrest group animals did not. Even 12 weeks after cardiac arrest, the single p values showed that the control animals displayed a trend to perform better than the resuscitated animals. Memory recall was impaired early after 8 min of ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest and might be a more valuable tool for cognitive testing than learning recall after global ischemia due to cardiac arrest.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 22 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 27%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 23%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 2 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 5%
Student > Master 1 5%
Other 1 5%
Unknown 6 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 8 36%
Neuroscience 2 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 5%
Psychology 1 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 5%
Other 1 5%
Unknown 8 36%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 June 2016.
All research outputs
#6,841,965
of 7,902,020 outputs
Outputs from BMC Veterinary Research
#962
of 1,194 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#223,506
of 267,774 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Veterinary Research
#58
of 67 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 1,194 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.6. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 67 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.