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Outlier analysis of functional genomic profiles enriches for oncology targets and enables precision medicine

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genomics, June 2016
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Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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8 Dimensions

Readers on

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42 Mendeley
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Title
Outlier analysis of functional genomic profiles enriches for oncology targets and enables precision medicine
Published in
BMC Genomics, June 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12864-016-2807-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Zhou Zhu, Nathan T. Ihle, Paul A. Rejto, Patrick P. Zarrinkar

Abstract

Genome-scale functional genomic screens across large cell line panels provide a rich resource for discovering tumor vulnerabilities that can lead to the next generation of targeted therapies. Their data analysis typically has focused on identifying genes whose knockdown enhances response in various pre-defined genetic contexts, which are limited by biological complexities as well as the incompleteness of our knowledge. We thus introduce a complementary data mining strategy to identify genes with exceptional sensitivity in subsets, or outlier groups, of cell lines, allowing an unbiased analysis without any a priori assumption about the underlying biology of dependency. Genes with outlier features are strongly and specifically enriched with those known to be associated with cancer and relevant biological processes, despite no a priori knowledge being used to drive the analysis. Identification of exceptional responders (outliers) may not lead only to new candidates for therapeutic intervention, but also tumor indications and response biomarkers for companion precision medicine strategies. Several tumor suppressors have an outlier sensitivity pattern, supporting and generalizing the notion that tumor suppressors can play context-dependent oncogenic roles. The novel application of outlier analysis described here demonstrates a systematic and data-driven analytical strategy to decipher large-scale functional genomic data for oncology target and precision medicine discoveries.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 42 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 1 2%
Spain 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Germany 1 2%
Unknown 38 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 26%
Researcher 5 12%
Professor 5 12%
Student > Master 4 10%
Other 4 10%
Other 8 19%
Unknown 5 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 11 26%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 12%
Computer Science 4 10%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 5%
Other 4 10%
Unknown 7 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 July 2016.
All research outputs
#6,360,776
of 10,628,989 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genomics
#4,351
of 6,719 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#148,979
of 275,182 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genomics
#123
of 174 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 10,628,989 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,719 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.2. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,182 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 174 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.