↓ Skip to main content

Nature of bacterial colonization influences transcription of mucin genes in mice during the first week of life

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Research Notes, August 2012
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
38 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
83 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Nature of bacterial colonization influences transcription of mucin genes in mice during the first week of life
Published in
BMC Research Notes, August 2012
DOI 10.1186/1756-0500-5-402
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anders Bergström, Matilde B Kristensen, Martin I Bahl, Stine B Metzdorff, Lisbeth N Fink, Hanne Frøkiær, Tine R Licht

Abstract

Postnatal regulation of the small intestinal mucus layer is potentially important in the development of adult gut functionality. We hypothesized that the nature of bacterial colonization affects mucus gene regulation in early life.We thus analyzed the influence of the presence of a conventional microbiota as well as two selected monocolonizing bacterial strains on the transcription of murine genes involved in mucus layer development during the first week of life.Mouse pups (N = 8/group) from differently colonized dams: Germ-free (GF), conventional specific pathogen free (SPF), monocolonized with either Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM (Lb) or Escherichia coli Nissle (Ec) were analyzed by qPCR on isolated ileal tissue sections from postnatal days 1 and 6 (PND1, PND6) after birth with respect to: (i) transcription of specific genes involved in mucus production (Muc1-4, Tff3) and (ii) amounts of 16S rRNA of Lactobacillus and E. coli. Quantification of 16S rRNA genes was performed to obtain a measure for amounts of colonized bacteria.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 83 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
Croatia 1 1%
Germany 1 1%
France 1 1%
Unknown 79 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 27 33%
Researcher 15 18%
Student > Master 12 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 7%
Student > Bachelor 5 6%
Other 11 13%
Unknown 7 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 37 45%
Immunology and Microbiology 11 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 11 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 7%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 1%
Other 6 7%
Unknown 11 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 August 2012.
All research outputs
#11,053,316
of 12,434,464 outputs
Outputs from BMC Research Notes
#2,308
of 2,781 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#104,739
of 122,123 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Research Notes
#38
of 47 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,434,464 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,781 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.4. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 122,123 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 47 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.