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Community perceptions of pre-eclampsia and eclampsia in southern Mozambique

Overview of attention for article published in Reproductive Health, June 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (51st percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

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18 Dimensions

Readers on

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249 Mendeley
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Title
Community perceptions of pre-eclampsia and eclampsia in southern Mozambique
Published in
Reproductive Health, June 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12978-016-0135-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Helena Boene, Marianne Vidler, Charfudin Sacoor, Abel Nhama, Ariel Nhacolo, Cassimo Bique, Pedro Alonso, Diane Sawchuck, Rahat Qureshi, Eusébio Macete, Clara Menéndez, Peter von Dadelszen, Esperança Sevene, Khátia Munguambe

Abstract

Sub-Saharan Africa has the highest maternal mortality ratio at 500 deaths per 100,000 live births. In Mozambique maternal mortality is estimated at 249-480 per 100,000 live births and eclampsia is the third leading cause of death. The objective of this study was to describe the community understanding of pre-eclampsia and eclampsia, as a crucial step to improve maternal and perinatal health in southern Mozambique. This qualitative study was conducted in Maputo and Gaza Provinces of southern Mozambique. Twenty focus groups were convened with pregnant women, partners and husbands, matrons and traditional birth attendants, and mothers and mothers-in-law. In addition, ten interviews were conducted with traditional healers, matrons, and a traditional birth attendant. All discussions were audio-recorded, translated from local language (Changana) to Portuguese and transcribed verbatim prior to analysis with QSR NVivo 10. A thematic analysis approach was taken. The conditions of "pre-eclampsia" and "eclampsia" were not known in these communities; however, participants were familiar with hypertension and seizures in pregnancy. Terms linked with the biomedical concept of pre-eclampsia were high blood pressure, fainting disease and illness of the heart, whereas illness of the moon, snake illness, falling disease, childhood illness, illness of scaresand epilepsy were used to characterizeeclampsia. The causes of hypertension in pregnancy were thought to include mistreatment by in-laws, marital problems, and excessive worrying. Seizures in pregnancy were believed to be caused by a snake living inside the woman's body. Warning signs thought to be common to both conditions were headache, chest pain, weakness, dizziness, fainting, sweating, and swollen feet. Local beliefs in southern Mozambique, regarding the causes, presentation, outcomes and treatment of pre-eclampsia and eclampsia were not aligned with the biomedical perspective. The community was often unaware of the link between hypertension and seizures in pregnancy. The numerous widespread myths and misconceptions concerning pre-eclampsia and eclampsiamay induceinappropriatetreatment-seeking and demonstrate a need for increased community education regarding pregnancy and associated complications. NCT01911494.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 249 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Mozambique 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Unknown 247 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 48 19%
Researcher 32 13%
Student > Bachelor 28 11%
Unspecified 16 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 15 6%
Other 52 21%
Unknown 58 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 51 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 50 20%
Unspecified 28 11%
Social Sciences 19 8%
Psychology 11 4%
Other 23 9%
Unknown 67 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 September 2016.
All research outputs
#12,666,770
of 22,877,793 outputs
Outputs from Reproductive Health
#890
of 1,418 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#162,641
of 340,473 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Reproductive Health
#21
of 31 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,877,793 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,418 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.1. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 340,473 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 31 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.