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Integrating expert knowledge in a GIS to optimize siting decisions for small-scale healthy food retail interventions

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Health Geographics, June 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#50 of 569)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
1 blog
twitter
4 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
20 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
123 Mendeley
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Title
Integrating expert knowledge in a GIS to optimize siting decisions for small-scale healthy food retail interventions
Published in
International Journal of Health Geographics, June 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12942-016-0048-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Richard Casey Sadler

Abstract

The availability of healthy foods in a neighborhood remains a key determinant of diet and diet-related disease in disadvantaged communities. Innovative solutions to the 'food desert' problem include the deployment of mobile markets and healthy corner store initiatives. Such initiatives, however, do not always capitalize on the principles guiding retail development and the possibilities of GIS-based data. Simultaneously, community partners are not always engaged effectively in the planning for such interventions, which limits acceptability and suitability of such work. This paper highlights the results of a participatory mapping exercise to optimize the siting of a planned healthy food retail intervention in Flint, Michigan. Potential sites are chosen by engaging experts in a three-stage mapping process that includes the analytic hierarchy process and point allocation of five key variables (including food access, socioeconomic distress, population density, access to transit, and proximity to neighborhood centers), as well as direct mapping of suitable sites. Results suggest a discrete set of areas-primarily in the northwestern quadrant of the city-where small-scale healthy food retail interventions might be most strategically located. Areas with the most consistent overlap between directly mapped sites and very high levels of suitability align well with neighborhoods which are distant from existing grocery stores. As a community-based strategy, this increases the opportunity for effectively improving neighborhood access to healthy foods by optimizing the potential sites for healthy food interventions. Community partners have already been active in using these results in project planning for just such an intervention.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 123 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 121 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 30 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 15%
Student > Bachelor 17 14%
Researcher 16 13%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 4%
Other 18 15%
Unknown 18 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 22 18%
Nursing and Health Professions 17 14%
Engineering 13 11%
Environmental Science 11 9%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 6%
Other 29 24%
Unknown 24 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 18. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 July 2016.
All research outputs
#1,213,848
of 16,730,735 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Health Geographics
#50
of 569 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#26,015
of 268,387 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Health Geographics
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,730,735 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 569 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,387 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them