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The status of maternal and newborn health care services in Zanzibar

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, June 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (60th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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13 Dimensions

Readers on

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152 Mendeley
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Title
The status of maternal and newborn health care services in Zanzibar
Published in
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, June 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12884-016-0928-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bakar Fakih, Azzah A. S. Nofly, Ali O. Ali, Abdallah Mkopi, Ali Hassan, Ali M. Ali, Kate Ramsey, Theopista John Kabuteni, Godfrey Mbaruku, Mwifadhi Mrisho

Abstract

It is estimated that 287,000 women worldwide die annually from pregnancy and childbirth-related conditions, and 6.9 million under-five children die each year, of which about 3 million are newborns. Most of these deaths occur in sub-Saharan Africa. The maternal health situation in Tanzania mainland and Zanzibar is similar to other sub-Saharan countries. This study assessed the availability, accessibility and quality of emergency obstetric care services and essential resources available for maternal and child health services in Zanzibar. From October and November 2012, a cross-sectional health facility survey was conducted in 79 health facilities in Zanzibar. The health facility tools developed by the Averting Maternal Death and Disability program were adapted for local use. Only 7.6 % of the health facilities qualified as functioning basic EmONC (Emergency Obstetric and Neonatal Care) facilities and 9 % were comprehensive EmONC facilities. Twenty-eight percent were partially performing basic EmONC and the remaining 55.7 % were not providing EmONC. Neonatal resuscitation was performed in 80 % of the hospitals and only 17.4 % of the other health facilities that were surveyed. Based on World Health Organisation (WHO) criteria, the study revealed a gap of 20 % for minimum provision of EmONC facilities per 500,000 population. The met need at national level (proportion of women with major direct obstetric complications treated in a health facility providing EmONC) was only 33.1 % in the 12 months preceding the survey. The study found that there was limited availability of human resources in all visited health facilities, particularly for the higher cadres, as per Zanzibar minimum staff requirements. There is a need to strengthen human resource capacity at primary health facilities through training of health care providers to improve EmONC services, as well as provision of necessary equipment and supplies to reduce workload at the higher referral health facilities and increase geographic access.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 152 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Kenya 1 <1%
Tanzania, United Republic of 1 <1%
Unknown 150 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 29 19%
Student > Master 27 18%
Student > Bachelor 17 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 11%
Student > Postgraduate 10 7%
Other 21 14%
Unknown 31 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 41 27%
Social Sciences 25 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 24 16%
Engineering 3 2%
Business, Management and Accounting 3 2%
Other 19 13%
Unknown 37 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 June 2016.
All research outputs
#3,329,510
of 7,909,849 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#922
of 1,615 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#102,434
of 262,878 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#43
of 81 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,909,849 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 57th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,615 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.2. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 262,878 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 81 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.