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In vivo hepatogenic capacity and therapeutic potential of stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth in liver fibrosis in mice

Overview of attention for article published in Stem Cell Research & Therapy, September 2015
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Title
In vivo hepatogenic capacity and therapeutic potential of stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth in liver fibrosis in mice
Published in
Stem Cell Research & Therapy, September 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13287-015-0154-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Takayoshi Yamaza, Fatima Safira Alatas, Ratih Yuniartha, Haruyoshi Yamaza, Junko K. Fujiyoshi, Yusuke Yanagi, Koichiro Yoshimaru, Makoto Hayashida, Toshiharu Matsuura, Reona Aijima, Kenji Ihara, Shouichi Ohga, Songtao Shi, Kazuaki Nonaka, Tomoaki Taguchi

Abstract

Liver transplantation is a gold standard treatment for intractable liver diseases. Because of the shortage of donor organs, alternative therapies have been required. Due to their potential to differentiate into a variety of mature cells, stem cells are considered feasible cell sources for liver regeneration. Stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED) exhibit hepatogenic capability in vitro. In this study, we investigated their in vivo capabilities of homing and hepatocyte differentiation and therapeutic efficacy for liver disorders in carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced liver fibrosis model mice. We transplanted SHED into CCl4-induced liver fibrosis model mice through the spleen, and analyzed the in vivo homing and therapeutic effects by optical, biochemical, histological, immunological and molecular biological assays. We then sorted human leukocyte antigen-ABC (HLA-ABC)-positive cells from primary CCl4-damaged recipient livers, and analyzed their fusogenicity and hepatic characteristics by flow cytometric, genomic DNA, hepatocyte-specific gene assays. Furthermore, we examined the treatment effects of HLA-positive cells to a hepatic dysfunction by a secondary transplantation into CCl4-treated mice. Transplanted SHED homed to recipient livers, and expressed HLA-ABC, human hepatocyte specific antigen hepatocyte paraffin 1 and human albumin. SHED transplantation markedly recovered liver dysfunction and led to anti-fibrotic and anti-inflammatory effects in the recipient livers. SHED-derived HLA-ABC-positive cells that were sorted from the primary recipient liver tissues with CCl4 damage did not fuse with the host mouse liver cells. Sorted HLA-positive cells not only expressed human hepatocyte-specific genes including albumin, cytochrome P450 1A1, fumarylacetoacetase, tyrosine aminotransferase, uridine 5'-diphospho-glucuronosyltransferase, transferrin and transthyretin, but also secreted human albumin, urea and blood urea nitrogen. Furthermore, SHED-derived HLA-ABC-positive cells were secondary transplanted into CCl4-treated mice. The donor cells homed into secondary recipient livers, and expressed hepatocyte paraffin 1 and human albumin, as well as HLA-ABC. The secondary transplantation recovered a liver dysfunction in secondary recipients. This study indicates that transplanted SHED improve hepatic dysfunction and directly transform into hepatocytes without cell fusion in CCl4-treated mice, suggesting that SHED may provide a feasible cell source for liver regeneration.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 67 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Colombia 1 1%
Unknown 66 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 16%
Researcher 6 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 7%
Student > Bachelor 4 6%
Other 14 21%
Unknown 21 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 25 37%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 7%
Unspecified 4 6%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 4%
Other 3 4%
Unknown 22 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 June 2016.
All research outputs
#6,850,415
of 7,912,542 outputs
Outputs from Stem Cell Research & Therapy
#544
of 619 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#220,209
of 263,161 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Stem Cell Research & Therapy
#23
of 26 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,912,542 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 619 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.9. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,161 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 26 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.