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Association of HLA class I and II genes with cutaneous leishmaniasis: a case control study from Sri Lanka and a systematic review

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, June 2016
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Title
Association of HLA class I and II genes with cutaneous leishmaniasis: a case control study from Sri Lanka and a systematic review
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, June 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12879-016-1626-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nilakshi Samaranayake, Sumadhya D. Fernando, Nilaksha F. Neththikumara, Chaturaka Rodrigo, Nadira D. Karunaweera, Vajira H. W. Dissanayake

Abstract

The outcome of leishmaniasis is an interplay between Leishamania and the host. Identifying contributory host genetic factors is complicated by the variability in phenotype, ethnicity and parasite species. Leishmaniasis is caused exclusively by L. donovani in Sri Lanka with localized cutaneous leishmaniasis (LCL) being the predominant form. We report here an association study of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class I and II genes with LCL in Sri Lanka, the first on HLA associations in cutaneous leishmaniasis in a South Asian population. An existing DNA repository of 200 each of patients and controls was typed for HLA-DQ by PCR-SSP. Next generation sequencing-based typing for HLA-A, HLA-B and HLA-DRB1 alleles was done in a subset of 280 samples. Association tests were performed on 28,489 genotyped and imputed SNPs spanning a region of 1.4 Mb across the HLA genes. To compare our results with similar studies, we carried out a systematic review to document all HLA associations reported to-date for cutaneous and muco-cutaneous leishmaniasis. DRB1*04 DQB1*02 (P = 0.03; Pc = 0.09), DRB1*07 DQB1*02 (P = 0.03; Pc = 0.09) haplotypes were absent in patients. B*07 (P = 0.007; Pc = 0.13; OR = 0.36; 95 % CI = 0.17-0.77) allele and DRB1*15 DQB1*06 (P = 0.00; Pc < 0.01; OR = 0.3; 95 % CI = 0.2-.0.6) haplotype were over represented in controls and DRB1*15 (P = 0.002; Pc = 0.01) allele was over represented in patients. Two SNPs (rs281864595/rs1050517) in the antigen recognition region of HLA-B, comprised a haplotype more frequent in controls (P = 0.04). The alleles identified by the systematic review to predispose or to protect from cutaneous/mucocutaneous leishmaniasis remained highly heterogeneous in different populations studied. Our preliminary findings suggest a role for some class I and class II HLA genes in determining predisposition to LCL in this population which should be corroborated with further studies. The systematic review reiterates this need, as the purported susceptibility or protection gained by certain HLA alleles or haplotypes has rarely been independently verified.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 43 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 43 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 14%
Student > Bachelor 5 12%
Student > Master 5 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 9%
Other 5 12%
Unknown 14 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 23%
Immunology and Microbiology 5 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 7%
Computer Science 2 5%
Other 5 12%
Unknown 14 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 June 2016.
All research outputs
#5,717,748
of 7,912,542 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#2,327
of 3,557 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#169,144
of 263,160 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#77
of 165 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,912,542 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,557 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.8. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,160 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 165 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.