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A comparison of work-related physical activity levels between inpatient and outpatient physical therapists: an observational cohort trial

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Research Notes, June 2016
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1 tweeter

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62 Mendeley
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Title
A comparison of work-related physical activity levels between inpatient and outpatient physical therapists: an observational cohort trial
Published in
BMC Research Notes, June 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13104-016-2119-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Wayne Brewer, Raluchukwu Ogbazi, Devan Ohl, Jeffry Daniels, Alexis Ortiz

Abstract

Physical therapists (PTs) work in a variety of healthcare settings with varied levels of physical activity demands placed on them. The purpose of this study is to compare the physical activity (PA) levels between PTs in inpatient versus outpatient environments for one work week using a cross-sectional design. Sixty-one PTs (30 inpatient, 31 outpatient) wore a tri-axial accelerometer and inclinometer for one work-week. The number steps-per-day, PA intensities, energy expenditures and postural positions adopted during the work day were recorded. Significantly longer amounts of time spent sitting was found for inpatient PTs regardless of the significantly higher number of steps-per-day. Outpatient PTs had a higher number of breaks from sedentary activity with those breaks being longer than the inpatient PTs. The percentage of time spent performing moderate-vigorous PA approached significance implying more time was spent performing these types of activities for outpatient PTs. The energy expenditures between the two groups of PTs were not different. This study compared the differences in physical activity levels between physical therapists who worked at inpatient versus outpatient environment as little is known about their activity levels. Inpatient physical therapists took more steps per day than outpatient physical therapists but the outpatient physical therapists were less sedentary and took more frequent and longer breaks from sedentary activities. The energy expenditures were similar between both types of therapists and this may be reflective of the gender and bodyweight differences between the groups that equalizes the energy expenditures. The findings of this study suggests that there are differences in the physical activity demands between inpatient and outpatient physical therapists. The results of this study may serve dual purposes: (1) employers may be able to more accurately describe the expected physical activity demands to future employees; (2) individuals tasked with preparing PTs to physically manage their work environment can outline training programs that are diverse based on the specific work environment of PTs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 62 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
Unknown 61 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 9 15%
Student > Master 9 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 13%
Professor 7 11%
Student > Postgraduate 5 8%
Other 7 11%
Unknown 17 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 18 29%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 16%
Sports and Recreations 4 6%
Engineering 3 5%
Computer Science 2 3%
Other 4 6%
Unknown 21 34%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 June 2016.
All research outputs
#4,155,062
of 7,921,887 outputs
Outputs from BMC Research Notes
#984
of 1,943 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#142,433
of 262,461 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Research Notes
#52
of 81 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,921,887 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,943 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.5. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 262,461 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 81 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.