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Zbtb20 modulates the sequential generation of neuronal layers in developing cortex

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Brain, June 2016
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Title
Zbtb20 modulates the sequential generation of neuronal layers in developing cortex
Published in
Molecular Brain, June 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13041-016-0242-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anton B. Tonchev, Tran Cong Tuoc, Eva H. Rosenthal, Michèle Studer, Anastassia Stoykova

Abstract

During corticogenesis, genetic programs encoded in progenitor cells at different developmental stages and inherited in postmitotic neurons specify distinct layer and area identities. Transcription factor Zbtb20 has been shown to play a role for hippocampal development but whether it is implicated in mammalian neocortical morphogenesis remains unknown. Here, we report that during embyogenesis transcription factor Zbtb20 has a dynamic spatio-temporal expression pattern in mitotic cortical progenitors through which it modulates the sequential generation of cortical neuronal layer identities. Zbtb20 knock out mice exhibited enhanced populations of early born L6-L4 neuronal subtypes and a dramatic reduction of the late born L3/L2 neurons. This defect was due to a temporal misbalance in the production of earlier versus later born neurons, leading to a progressive diminishing of the progenitor pool for the generation of L3-L2 neurons. Zbtb20 implements these temporal effects in part by binding to promoter of the orphan nuclear receptor CoupTF1/Nr2f1. In addition to its effects exerted in cortical progenitors, the postmitotic expression of Zbtb20 in L3/L2 neurons starting at birth may contribute to their proper differentiation and migration. Our findings reveal Zbtb20 as a novel temporal regulator for the generation of layer-specific neuronal identities.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 52 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 52 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 13 25%
Student > Master 10 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 19%
Student > Bachelor 5 10%
Student > Postgraduate 4 8%
Other 5 10%
Unknown 5 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 21 40%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 19%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 10%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 2%
Other 1 2%
Unknown 6 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 June 2016.
All research outputs
#18,464,797
of 22,879,161 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Brain
#865
of 1,112 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#258,393
of 343,021 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Brain
#20
of 24 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,879,161 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,112 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.1. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 24 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.