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Evaluating the effectiveness of the SMART contract-signing strategy in reducing the growth of Swedish Adolescents’ substance use and problem behaviors

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, June 2016
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Citations

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63 Mendeley
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Title
Evaluating the effectiveness of the SMART contract-signing strategy in reducing the growth of Swedish Adolescents’ substance use and problem behaviors
Published in
BMC Public Health, June 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-3131-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Cristian Bortes, Susanna Geidne, Charli Eriksson

Abstract

In 2013, around 40 % of the schools in Sweden had structured programs to prevent tobacco and alcohol debut in compulsory school. There has unfortunately been a lack of scientific evidence to support most of the prevention methods focusing on primary prevention in schools in Sweden. The aim and purpose of the present study is to evaluate the effectiveness of the Non-Governmental Organization SMART contract-signing strategy in reducing the growth of youth substance use and other problem behaviors amongst Swedish adolescents. Students from five schools in a medium-sized Swedish municipality were surveyed in three waves from 7(th) to 9(th) grade of compulsory school. We used General Linear Model (GLM) repeated-measures ANOVA to test if the outcome measures smoking, use of snus and alcohol, drunkenness, delinquency, and bullying significantly changed different amounts over time in groups that had participated in the SMART program for long time, a short time, sporadically- or not at all. Groups were compared on demographic background variables, and outcome measures were assessed on all measurement occasions by a one-way ANOVA. The magnitude of group differences at the end of the study was estimated according to Cohen's d. Number of years with a contract has an effect on the levels of self-reported youth problems in 9(th) grade. We found small to medium-sized differences in measured outcomes between students who participated in the program for the longest period of time, 5 years, and who participated for the shortest time, 0-2 years. Findings suggests that the SMART program has preventive effects on adolescent substance use.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 63 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 63 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 16 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 11%
Researcher 7 11%
Student > Bachelor 6 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 6%
Other 9 14%
Unknown 14 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 9 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 11%
Computer Science 6 10%
Psychology 4 6%
Other 13 21%
Unknown 16 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 July 2016.
All research outputs
#3,955,426
of 7,974,292 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#4,800
of 6,850 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#130,321
of 262,511 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#213
of 285 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,974,292 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,850 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.8. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 262,511 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 285 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.