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Susceptibility patterns of Staphylococcus aureus biofilms in diabetic foot infections

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Microbiology, June 2016
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Title
Susceptibility patterns of Staphylococcus aureus biofilms in diabetic foot infections
Published in
BMC Microbiology, June 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12866-016-0737-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Carla Mottola, Carina S. Matias, João J. Mendes, José Melo-Cristino, Luís Tavares, Patrícia Cavaco-Silva, Manuela Oliveira

Abstract

Foot infections are a major cause of morbidity in people with diabetes and the most common cause of diabetes-related hospitalization and lower extremity amputation. Staphylococcus aureus is by far the most frequent species isolated from these infections. In particular, methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) has emerged as a major clinical and epidemiological problem in hospitals. MRSA strains have the ability to be resistant to most β-lactam antibiotics, but also to a wide range of other antimicrobials, making infections difficult to manage and very costly to treat. To date, there are two fifth-generation cephalosporins generally efficacious against MRSA, ceftaroline and ceftobripole, sharing a similar spectrum. Biofilm formation is one of the most important virulence traits of S. aureus. Biofilm growth plays an important role during infection by providing defence against several antagonistic mechanisms. In this study, we analysed the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of biofilm-producing S. aureus strains isolated from diabetic foot infections. The antibiotic minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined for ten antimicrobial compounds, along with the minimum biofilm inhibitory concentration (MBIC) and minimum biofilm eradication concentration (MBEC), followed by PCR identification of genetic determinants of biofilm production and antimicrobial resistance. Results demonstrate that very high concentrations of the most used antibiotics in treating diabetic foot infections (DFI) are required to inhibit S. aureus biofilms in vitro, which may explain why monotherapy with these agents frequently fails to eradicate biofilm infections. In fact, biofilms were resistant to antibiotics at concentrations 10-1000 times greater than the ones required to kill free-living or planktonic cells. The only antibiotics able to inhibit biofilm eradication on 50 % of isolates were ceftaroline and gentamicin. The results suggest that the antibiotic susceptibility patterns cannot be applied to biofilm established infections. Selection of antimicrobial therapy is a critical step in DFI and should aim at overcoming biofilm disease in order to optimize the outcomes of this complex pathology.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 165 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Chile 1 <1%
Unknown 163 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 25 15%
Student > Bachelor 25 15%
Student > Master 23 14%
Researcher 17 10%
Other 7 4%
Other 29 18%
Unknown 39 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 32 19%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 25 15%
Immunology and Microbiology 23 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 13 8%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 6 4%
Other 24 15%
Unknown 42 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 July 2016.
All research outputs
#5,798,233
of 8,019,263 outputs
Outputs from BMC Microbiology
#853
of 1,346 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#168,455
of 262,571 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Microbiology
#55
of 88 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,019,263 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,346 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.1. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 88 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.