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Differences in viral load among human respiratory syncytial virus genotypes in hospitalized children with severe acute respiratory infections in the Philippines

Overview of attention for article published in Virology Journal, June 2016
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1 tweeter

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Title
Differences in viral load among human respiratory syncytial virus genotypes in hospitalized children with severe acute respiratory infections in the Philippines
Published in
Virology Journal, June 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12985-016-0565-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Francois Marie Ngako Kadji, Michiko Okamoto, Yuki Furuse, Raita Tamaki, Akira Suzuki, Irene Lirio, Clyde Dapat, Rungnapa Malasao, Mariko Saito, Gay Anne Granada Pedrera-Rico, Veronica Tallo, Socorro Lupisan, Mayuko Saito, Hitoshi Oshitani

Abstract

Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is a leading viral etiologic agent of pediatric lower respiratory infections, including bronchiolitis and pneumonia. Two antigenic subgroups, HRSV-A and B, each contain several genotypes. While viral load may vary among HRSV genotypes and affect the clinical course of disease, data are scarce regarding the actual differences among genotypes. Therefore, this study estimated and compared viral load among NA1 and ON1 genotypes of HRSV-A and BA9 of HRSV-B. ON1 is a newly emerged genotype with a 72-nucleotide duplication in the G gene as observed previously with BA genotypes in HRSV-B. Children <5 years of age with an initial diagnosis of severe or very severe pneumonia at a hospital in the Philippines from September 2012 to December 2013 were enrolled. HRSV genotypes were determined and the viral load measured from nasopharyngeal swabs (NPS). The viral load of HRSV genotype NA1 were significantly higher than those of ON1 and BA9. Regression analysis showed that both genotype NA1 and younger age were significantly associated with high HRSV viral load. The viral load of NA1 was higher than that of ON1 and BA9 in NPS samples. HRSV genotypes may be associated with HRSV viral load. The reasons and clinical impacts of these differences in viral load among HRSV genotypes require further evaluation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 38 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 1 3%
Unknown 37 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 21%
Student > Master 6 16%
Researcher 4 11%
Student > Postgraduate 4 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 8%
Other 7 18%
Unknown 6 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 17 45%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 8%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 5%
Computer Science 1 3%
Other 2 5%
Unknown 8 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 June 2016.
All research outputs
#6,029,264
of 7,953,275 outputs
Outputs from Virology Journal
#1,266
of 1,625 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#183,411
of 261,446 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Virology Journal
#43
of 55 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,953,275 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,625 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.4. This one is in the 9th percentile – i.e., 9% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 261,446 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 55 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 3rd percentile – i.e., 3% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.