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Characterization of an L-arabinose isomerase from Bacillus coagulans NL01 and its application for D-tagatose production

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Biotechnology, June 2016
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Title
Characterization of an L-arabinose isomerase from Bacillus coagulans NL01 and its application for D-tagatose production
Published in
BMC Biotechnology, June 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12896-016-0286-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Wending Mei, Lu Wang, Ying Zang, Zhaojuan Zheng, Jia Ouyang

Abstract

L-arabinose isomerase (AI) is a crucial catalyst for the biotransformation of D-galactose to D-tagatose. In previous reports, AIs from thermophilic bacterial strains had been wildly researched, but the browning reaction and by-products formed at high temperatures restricted their applications. By contrast, AIs from mesophilic Bacillus strains have some different features including lower optimal temperatures and lower requirements of metallic cofactors. These characters will be beneficial to the development of a more energy-efficient and safer production process. However, the relevant data about the kinetics and reaction properties of Bacillus AIs in D-tagatose production are still insufficient. Thus, in order to support further applications of these AIs, a comprehensive characterization of a Bacillus AI is needed. The coding gene (1422 bp) of Bacillus coagulans NL01 AI (BCAI) was cloned and overexpressed in the Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) strain. The enzymatic property test showed that the optimal temperature and pH of BCAI were 60 °C and 7.5 respectively. The raw purified BCAI originally showed high activity in absence of outsourcing metallic ions and its thermostability did not change in a low concentration (0.5 mM) of Mn(2+) at temperatures from 70 °C to 90 °C. Besides these, the catalytic efficiencies (k cat/K m) for L-arabinose and D-galactose were 8.7 mM(-1) min(-1) and 1.0 mM(-1) min(-1) respectively. Under optimal conditions, the recombinant E. coli cell containing BCAI could convert 150 g L(-1) and 250 g L(-1) D-galactose to D-tagatose with attractive conversion rates of 32 % (32 h) and 27 % (48 h). In this study, a novel AI from B. coagulans NL01was cloned, purified and characterized. Compared with other reported AIs, this AI could retain high proportions of activity at a broader range of temperatures and was less dependent on metallic cofactors such as Mn(2+). Its substrate specificity was understood deeply by carrying out molecular modelling and docking studies. When the recombinant E. coli expressing the AI was used as a biocatalyst, D-tagatose could be produced efficiently in a simple one-pot biotransformation system.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 54 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
China 1 2%
Unknown 53 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 9 17%
Student > Master 8 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 13%
Researcher 5 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 7%
Other 11 20%
Unknown 10 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 17 31%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 22%
Engineering 3 6%
Chemical Engineering 2 4%
Chemistry 2 4%
Other 2 4%
Unknown 16 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 July 2016.
All research outputs
#5,768,245
of 7,987,814 outputs
Outputs from BMC Biotechnology
#338
of 475 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#167,776
of 260,862 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Biotechnology
#9
of 15 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,987,814 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 475 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.6. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 260,862 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 15 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.