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Integrating an infectious disease programme into the primary health care service: a retrospective analysis of Chagas disease community-based surveillance in Honduras

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, March 2015
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Title
Integrating an infectious disease programme into the primary health care service: a retrospective analysis of Chagas disease community-based surveillance in Honduras
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, March 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12913-015-0785-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ken Hashimoto, Concepción Zúniga, Jiro Nakamura, Kyo Hanada

Abstract

Integration of disease-specific programmes into the primary health care (PHC) service has been attempted mostly in clinically oriented disease control such as HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis but rarely in vector control. Chagas disease is controlled principally by interventions against the triatomine vector. In Honduras, after successful reduction of household infestation by vertical approach, the Ministry of Health implemented community-based vector surveillance at the PHC services (health centres) to prevent the resurgence of infection. This paper retrospectively analyses the effects and process of integrating a Chagas disease vector surveillance system into health centres. We evaluated the effects of integration at six pilot sites in western Honduras during 2008-2011 on; surveillance performance; knowledge, attitude and practice in schoolchildren; reports of triatomine bug infestation and institutional response; and seroprevalence among children under 15 years of age. The process of integration of the surveillance system was analysed using the PRECEDE-PROCEED model for health programme planning. The model was employed to systematically determine influential and interactive factors which facilitated the integration process at different levels of the Ministry of Health and the community. Overall surveillance performance improved from 46 to 84 on a 100 point-scale. Schoolchildren's attitude (risk awareness) score significantly increased from 77 to 83 points. Seroprevalence declined from 3.4% to 0.4%. Health centres responded to the community bug reports by insecticide spraying. As key factors, the health centres had potential management capacity and influence over the inhabitants' behaviours and living environment directly and through community health volunteers. The National Chagas Programme played an essential role in facilitating changes with adequate distribution of responsibilities, participatory modelling, training and, evaluation and advocacy. We found that Chagas disease vector surveillance can be integrated into the PHC service. Health centres demonstrated capacity to manage vector surveillance and improve performance, children's awareness, vector report-response and seroprevalence, once tasks were simplified to be performed by trained non-specialists and distributed among the stakeholders. Health systems integration requires health workers to perform beyond their usual responsibilities and acquire management skills. Integration of vector control is feasible and can contribute to strengthening the preventive capacity of the PHC service.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 171 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 1%
Brazil 2 1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 166 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 33 19%
Researcher 26 15%
Student > Bachelor 23 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 21 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 6%
Other 20 12%
Unknown 37 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 36 21%
Nursing and Health Professions 31 18%
Social Sciences 18 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 5%
Immunology and Microbiology 5 3%
Other 29 17%
Unknown 44 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 July 2016.
All research outputs
#8,066,811
of 10,311,177 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#2,942
of 3,546 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#185,971
of 267,364 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#122
of 143 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 10,311,177 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 12th percentile – i.e., 12% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,546 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.7. This one is in the 7th percentile – i.e., 7% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 143 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 7th percentile – i.e., 7% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.