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Trends in reproductive health in Israel: implications for environmental health policy

Overview of attention for article published in Israel Journal of Health Policy Research, August 2012
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Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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12 Dimensions

Readers on

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52 Mendeley
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Title
Trends in reproductive health in Israel: implications for environmental health policy
Published in
Israel Journal of Health Policy Research, August 2012
DOI 10.1186/2045-4015-1-34
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tamar Berman, Hagai Levine, Ronni Gamzu, Itamar Grotto

Abstract

Nearly two decades ago, researchers first reported that endocrine disrupting chemicals in the environment were affecting reproductive health in the general population. The purpose of this article is to examine the evidence of adverse reproductive health trends in Israel and to explore implications for environmental health policy in Israel. We reviewed studies and data in Israel regarding trends in reproductive health indices, specifically: breast and testis cancer, hypospadias, sperm quality, male factor infertility, and age at menarche. The data provide some evidence of adverse reproductive trends in the Israeli population: an increase in testicular cancer from 1990 to 2007, a decrease in age at menarche from 1986 to 2000, an increase in the prevalence of male factor infertility, and some evidence of decreasing sperm counts. However, we note that much of the evidence is limited.The policy implications of reported adverse reproductive health trends possibly related to environmental exposure have been radically different in Europe and the United States. In Europe, such reports led the Parliament of the European Community to adopt a resolution on endocrine disruptors, which emphasizes the application of the Precautionary Principle. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency policy is focused on screening chemicals for endocrine disrupting properties and does not specifically refer to the Precautionary Principle. To date, there has been no formal governmental policy or strategy in Israel regarding endocrine disrupting chemicals. Environmental health policy on endocrine disruptors requires integrating evidence on human reproductive health trends, evidence on adverse reproductive outcomes in wildlife and experimental systems, and data from biomonitoring studies. Despite gaps in evidence and current data, we support a precautionary approach to regulating potential endocrine disrupting chemicals and reducing public exposures, especially in sensitive groups such as children and pregnant women.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 52 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Denmark 1 2%
Pakistan 1 2%
Unknown 50 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 12%
Student > Bachelor 5 10%
Researcher 3 6%
Other 8 15%
Unknown 13 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 19%
Social Sciences 6 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 8%
Environmental Science 4 8%
Other 10 19%
Unknown 13 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 April 2018.
All research outputs
#11,827,970
of 20,258,946 outputs
Outputs from Israel Journal of Health Policy Research
#181
of 548 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#77,622
of 145,696 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Israel Journal of Health Policy Research
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,258,946 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 548 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 145,696 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them