↓ Skip to main content

Medical nutrition therapy: use of sourdough lactic acid bacteria as a cell factory for delivering functional biomolecules and food ingredients in gluten free bread

Overview of attention for article published in Microbial Cell Factories, January 2011
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (69th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
5 Wikipedia pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
71 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
164 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Medical nutrition therapy: use of sourdough lactic acid bacteria as a cell factory for delivering functional biomolecules and food ingredients in gluten free bread
Published in
Microbial Cell Factories, January 2011
DOI 10.1186/1475-2859-10-s1-s15
Pubmed ID
Authors

Elke K Arendt, Alice Moroni, Emanuele Zannini

Abstract

Celiac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated disease, triggered in genetically susceptible individuals by ingesting gluten from wheat, rye, barley, and other closely related cereal grains. Currently, the estimated prevalence of CD is around 1 % of the population in the western world and medical nutritional therapy (MNT) is the only accepted treatment for celiac disease. To date, the replacement of gluten in bread presents a significant technological challenge for the cereal scientist due to the low baking performance of gluten free products (GF). The increasing demand by the consumer for high quality gluten-free (GF) bread, clean labels and natural products is rising. Sourdough has been used since ancient times for the production of rye and wheat bread, its universal usage can be attributed to the improved quality, nutritional properties and shelf life of sourdough based breads. Consequently, the exploitation of sourdough for the production of GF breads appears tempting. This review will highlight how sourdough LAB can be an efficient cell factory for delivering functional biomolecules and food ingredients to enhance the quality of gluten free bread.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 164 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 1%
India 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Unknown 159 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 32 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 26 16%
Student > Bachelor 24 15%
Researcher 22 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 5%
Other 25 15%
Unknown 27 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 54 33%
Medicine and Dentistry 18 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 14 9%
Engineering 10 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 5%
Other 26 16%
Unknown 33 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 November 2018.
All research outputs
#5,341,984
of 17,638,294 outputs
Outputs from Microbial Cell Factories
#338
of 1,285 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#40,167
of 139,754 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Microbial Cell Factories
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,638,294 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 69th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,285 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 139,754 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them