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Adverse pregnancy outcomes in women with diabetes

Overview of attention for article published in Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome, September 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#37 of 635)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
policy
1 policy source
twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
120 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
293 Mendeley
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Title
Adverse pregnancy outcomes in women with diabetes
Published in
Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome, September 2012
DOI 10.1186/1758-5996-4-41
Pubmed ID
Authors

Carlos Antonio Negrato, Rosiane Mattar, Marilia B Gomes

Abstract

Pregnancy affects both the maternal and fetal metabolism and even in nondiabetic women exerts a diabetogenic effect. Among pregnant women, 2 to 17.8% develop gestational diabetes. Pregnancy can also occur in women with preexisting diabetes, that can predispose the fetus to many alterations in organogenesis, growth restriction and the mother to some diabetes-related complications like retinopathy and nephropathy or accelerate the course of these complications if they are already present. Women with gestational diabetes generally start their treatment with diet and lifestyle modification; when these changes fail in keeping an optimal glycemic control, then insulin therapy must be considered. Women with type 2 diabetes in use of oral hypoglycemic agents are advised to change to insulin therapy. Those with preexisting type 1 diabetes must start an intensive glycemic control, preferably before conception. All these procedures are performed aiming to keep glycemic levels normal or near-normal as possible to avoid the occurrence of adverse perinatal outcomes to the mother and to the fetus. The aim of this review is to reinforce the need to improve the knowledge on reproductive health of women with diabetes during gestation and to understand what are the reasons for them failing to attend for prepregnancy care programs, and to understand the underlying mechanisms of adverse fetal and maternal outcomes, which in turn may lead to strategies for its prevention.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 293 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Turkey 1 <1%
Norway 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Russia 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 286 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 54 18%
Student > Bachelor 49 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 28 10%
Student > Postgraduate 27 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 22 8%
Other 58 20%
Unknown 55 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 124 42%
Nursing and Health Professions 42 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 16 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 13 4%
Social Sciences 7 2%
Other 27 9%
Unknown 64 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 23. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 June 2022.
All research outputs
#1,336,942
of 22,100,435 outputs
Outputs from Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome
#37
of 635 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#7,751
of 150,486 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,100,435 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 635 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 150,486 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them