↓ Skip to main content

A trans-disciplinary approach to the evaluation of social determinants of health in a hispanic population

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, September 2012
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
21 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
124 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
A trans-disciplinary approach to the evaluation of social determinants of health in a hispanic population
Published in
BMC Public Health, September 2012
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-12-769
Pubmed ID
Authors

Michael F Dulin, Hazel Tapp, Heather A Smith, Brisa Urquieta de Hernandez, Maren J Coffman, Tom Ludden, Janni Sorensen, Owen J Furuseth

Abstract

Individual and community health are adversely impacted by disparities in health outcomes among disadvantaged and vulnerable populations. Understanding the underlying causes for variations in health outcomes is an essential step towards developing effective interventions to ameliorate inequalities and subsequently improve overall community health. Working at the neighborhood scale, this study examines multiple social determinates that can cause health disparities including low neighborhood wealth, weak social networks, inadequate public infrastructure, the presence of hazardous materials in or near a neighborhood, and the lack of access to primary care services. The goal of this research is to develop innovative and replicable strategies to improve community health in disadvantaged communities such as newly arrived Hispanic immigrants.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 124 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 2 2%
United States 2 2%
India 1 <1%
Peru 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Unknown 116 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 30 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 17%
Researcher 12 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 8%
Student > Bachelor 8 6%
Other 30 24%
Unknown 13 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 28 23%
Social Sciences 25 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 17 14%
Psychology 7 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 3%
Other 21 17%
Unknown 22 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 September 2012.
All research outputs
#7,141,299
of 12,372,633 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#5,660
of 8,418 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#62,722
of 126,539 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#46
of 82 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,372,633 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,418 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.7. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 126,539 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 82 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.