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On the persistence of supplementary resources in biomedical publications

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Bioinformatics, May 2006
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
2 blogs
twitter
2 tweeters
googleplus
1 Google+ user
q&a
1 Q&A thread

Citations

dimensions_citation
39 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
65 Mendeley
citeulike
8 CiteULike
connotea
2 Connotea
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Title
On the persistence of supplementary resources in biomedical publications
Published in
BMC Bioinformatics, May 2006
DOI 10.1186/1471-2105-7-260
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nicholas R Anderson, Peter Tarczy-Hornoch, Roger E Bumgarner

Abstract

Providing for long-term and consistent public access to scientific data is a growing concern in biomedical research. One aspect of this problem can be demonstrated by evaluating the persistence of supplementary data associated with published biomedical papers. We manually evaluated 655 supplementary data links extracted from PubMed abstracts published 1998-2005 (Method 1) as well as a further focused subset of 162 full-text manuscripts published within three representative high-impact biomedical journals between September and December 2004 (Method 2). For Method 1 we found that since 2001, only 71 - 92% of supplementary data were still accessible via the links provided, with 93% of these inaccessible links occurring where supplementary data was not stored with the publishing journal. Of the manuscripts evaluated in Method 2, we found that only 83% of these links were available approximately a year after publication, with 55% of these inaccessible links were at locations outside the journal of publication. We conclude that if supplemental data is required to support the publication, journals policies must take-on the responsibility to accept and store such data or require that it be maintained with a credible independent institution or under the terms of a strategic data storage plan specified by the authors. We further recommend that publishers provide automated systems to ensure that supplementary links remain persistent, and that granting bodies such as the NIH develop policies and funding mechanisms to maintain long-term persistent access to these data.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 65 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 13 20%
Germany 3 5%
United Kingdom 3 5%
Brazil 1 2%
Canada 1 2%
France 1 2%
Spain 1 2%
Iceland 1 2%
Japan 1 2%
Other 1 2%
Unknown 39 60%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 22 34%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 17%
Other 8 12%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 6%
Other 12 18%
Unknown 3 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Computer Science 23 35%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 12%
Social Sciences 6 9%
Engineering 2 3%
Other 12 18%
Unknown 4 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 20. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 March 2021.
All research outputs
#1,425,161
of 20,792,815 outputs
Outputs from BMC Bioinformatics
#313
of 6,831 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#8,994
of 149,880 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Bioinformatics
#2
of 24 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,792,815 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,831 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 149,880 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 24 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.