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Patterns and causes of liver involvement in acute dengue infection

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, July 2016
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (65th percentile)

Mentioned by

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7 tweeters

Citations

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106 Dimensions

Readers on

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172 Mendeley
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Title
Patterns and causes of liver involvement in acute dengue infection
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, July 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12879-016-1656-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Samitha Fernando, Ananda Wijewickrama, Laksiri Gomes, Chameera T. Punchihewa, S. D. P. Madusanka, Harsha Dissanayake, Chandima Jeewandara, Hemantha Peiris, Graham S. Ogg, Gathsaurie Neelika Malavige

Abstract

Liver involvement in acute dengue infection is frequently observed and sometimes leads to acute liver failure, with fatal outcomes. Many factors are thought to contribute to liver dysfunction, including hypoxic injury due to decreased perfusion, direct damage by the virus and immune mediated injury. In this study, we sought to identify the pattern in the change in liver enzymes throughout the illness and its association with the degree of viraemia, onset and extent of plasma leakage and inflammatory mediators. Serial daily blood samples were obtained from 55 adult patients with acute dengue from the time of admission to discharge and the liver function tests, viral loads and cytokines were assessed. The onset and extent of fluid leakage was measured by daily ultrasound examinations and all clinical and laboratory features were serially recorded. Aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT) and gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT) levels were elevated in patients with dengue infection throughout the illness. The highest AST levels were seen on day 6 of illness and both AST and GGT levels were significantly higher in patients with severe dengue (SD), when compared to those with non-severe dengue (NSD) on day 5 and 6 of illness. Three patients with SD had AST and ALT values of >1000/IU in the absence of any fluid leakage or a rise in the haematocrit (≥20 %). The peak of the AST levels and the lowest serum albumin levels were seen 24 h before the maximum fluid leakage and 24 h after the peak in viraemia. Both serum IL-10 and IL-17 levels were elevated during early illness and were significantly higher in those with SD when compared to NSD. Dengue associated liver injury appears to peak around day 6 and 7. Therefore, liver function tests done at earlier dates might not reflect the extent of liver involvement in acute infection. Since severe liver involvement can occur in the absence of fluid leakage, after the peak viraemia, and since it is associated with high IL-17 and IL-10 levels, possible immune mechanisms leading to hepatic damage should be investigated.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 172 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 172 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 27 16%
Student > Postgraduate 26 15%
Student > Master 20 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 5%
Other 25 15%
Unknown 50 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 57 33%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 21 12%
Immunology and Microbiology 20 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 3%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 2%
Other 12 7%
Unknown 53 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 September 2017.
All research outputs
#6,457,675
of 20,545,634 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#2,103
of 7,077 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#92,171
of 272,834 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,545,634 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 67th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,077 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 272,834 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them