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Isoform D of vascular endothelial growth factor in systemic capillary leak syndrome: a case report

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Medical Case Reports, May 2016
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Title
Isoform D of vascular endothelial growth factor in systemic capillary leak syndrome: a case report
Published in
Journal of Medical Case Reports, May 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13256-016-0894-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Soushi Ibata, Tsutomu Sato, Kohichi Takada, Ayumi Tatekoshi, Akari Hashimoto, Yusuke Kamihara, Wataru Jomen, Hiroto Horiguchi, Kaoru Ono, Kazuyuki Murase, Satoshi Iyama, Koji Miyanishi, Yasushi Sato, Rishu Takimoto, Masayoshi Kobune, Junji Kato

Abstract

Systemic capillary leak syndrome is a rare condition characterized by episodic attacks of hypovolemia due to systemic capillary hyperpermeability, which results in profound hypotension and edema. Although the implication of vascular endothelial growth factor, angiopoietin-2, and C-X-C motif chemokine 10 has been suggested, the pathogenesis of systemic capillary leak syndrome remains unclear. In this report, we describe a case of systemic capillary leak syndrome in which serum isoform D of vascular endothelial growth factor was elevated. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of systemic capillary leak syndrome in which isoform D of vascular endothelial growth factor is suggested as the plausible biomarker. A 41-year-old Japanese man was transferred to our emergency department. He was hypotensive, tachycardic, and edematous over the trunk and all four limbs. He received aggressive intravenous fluid therapy and underwent fasciotomy of the right forearm to prevent muscle necrosis. A diagnosis of systemic capillary leak syndrome was suspected. The presence of serum monoclonal immunoglobulin G and κ light chain supported this diagnosis. Prevention of hypotensive crises was unsuccessfully attempted with theophylline, intravenous immunoglobulin, high-dose dexamethasone, bortezomib, melphalan, and prednisolone; however, the patient's attacks dramatically disappeared after the introduction of thalidomide. The serum of the patient was stored soon after the onset of hypotensive crisis and analyzed to profile possible mediators responsible for the capillary leak. The concentration of vascular endothelial growth factor, angiopoietin-2, and C-X-C motif chemokine 10 were all within normal ranges. Meanwhile, we found that isoform D of vascular endothelial growth factor was elevated, which was normalized after the introduction of thalidomide. In our patient, isoform D of vascular endothelial growth factor (instead of vascular endothelial growth factor) may have been a causative factor of hypotensive crises, since isoform D contributes to vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 signaling, which is the major mediator of the permeability-enhancing effects of vascular endothelial growth factor. We suggest the measurement of isoform D of vascular endothelial growth factor in patients with systemic capillary leak syndrome in whose serum vascular endothelial growth factor is not elevated.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 12 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 12 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 2 17%
Student > Master 2 17%
Student > Bachelor 1 8%
Other 1 8%
Lecturer 1 8%
Other 1 8%
Unknown 4 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 50%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 17%
Chemistry 1 8%
Unknown 3 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 July 2016.
All research outputs
#6,957,744
of 8,037,685 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Medical Case Reports
#1,083
of 1,468 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#217,514
of 258,924 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Medical Case Reports
#48
of 78 outputs
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