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Conservation of genetic uniqueness of populations may increase extinction likelihood of endangered species: the case of Australian mammals

Overview of attention for article published in Frontiers in Zoology, July 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#34 of 614)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
68 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
72 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
164 Mendeley
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Title
Conservation of genetic uniqueness of populations may increase extinction likelihood of endangered species: the case of Australian mammals
Published in
Frontiers in Zoology, July 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12983-016-0163-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Andrew R. Weeks, Jakub Stoklosa, Ary A. Hoffmann

Abstract

As increasingly fragmented and isolated populations of threatened species become subjected to climate change, invasive species and other stressors, there is an urgent need to consider adaptive potential when making conservation decisions rather than focussing on past processes. In many cases, populations identified as unique and currently managed separately suffer increased risk of extinction through demographic and genetic processes. Other populations currently not at risk are likely to be on a trajectory where declines in population size and fitness soon appear inevitable. Using datasets from natural Australian mammal populations, we show that drift processes are likely to be driving uniqueness in populations of many threatened species as a result of small population size and fragmentation. Conserving and managing such remnant populations separately will therefore often decrease their adaptive potential and increase species extinction risk. These results highlight the need for a paradigm shift in conservation biology practise; strategies need to focus on the preservation of genetic diversity at the species level, rather than population, subspecies or evolutionary significant unit. The introduction of new genetic variants into populations through in situ translocation needs to be considered more broadly in conservation programs as a way of decreasing extinction risk by increasing neutral genetic diversity which may increase the adaptive potential of populations if adaptive variation is also increased.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 68 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 164 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Finland 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Unknown 162 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 35 21%
Student > Master 31 19%
Researcher 30 18%
Student > Bachelor 25 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 4%
Other 17 10%
Unknown 20 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 82 50%
Environmental Science 23 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 22 13%
Social Sciences 3 2%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 2 1%
Other 6 4%
Unknown 26 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 52. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 December 2019.
All research outputs
#552,651
of 19,306,168 outputs
Outputs from Frontiers in Zoology
#34
of 614 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#12,283
of 269,703 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Frontiers in Zoology
#1
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,306,168 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 614 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 20.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,703 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them