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Pre-diagnostic body mass index and weight change in relation to colorectal cancer survival among incident cases from a population-based cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Cancer, July 2016
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Title
Pre-diagnostic body mass index and weight change in relation to colorectal cancer survival among incident cases from a population-based cohort study
Published in
BMC Cancer, July 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12885-016-2445-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ida Laake, Inger K. Larsen, Randi Selmer, Inger Thune, Marit B. Veierød

Abstract

Whether excess body weight influences colorectal cancer (CRC) survival is unclear. We studied pre-diagnostic body mass index (BMI) and weight change in relation to CRC-specific mortality among incident CRC cases within a large, Norwegian cohort. Participants' weight was measured at health examinations up to three times between 1974 and 1988. CRC cases were identified through linkage with the Norwegian Cancer Registry. In total, 1336 men and 1180 women with a weight measurement >3 years prior to diagnosis were included in analyses. Hazard ratios (HRs) and confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated with Cox regression. During a mean follow-up of 5.8 years, 507 men and 432 women died from CRC. Obesity (BMI ≥30 kg/m(2)) was associated with higher CRC-specific mortality than normal weight (BMI 18.5-25 kg/m(2)) in men with proximal colon cancer, HR = 1.85 (95 % CI 1.08-3.16) and in women with rectal cancer, HR = 1.93 (95 % CI 1.13-3.30). Weight gain was associated with higher CRC-specific mortality in women with CRC, colon cancer, and distal colon cancer, HRs per 5 kg weight gain were 1.18 (95 % CI 1.01-1.37), 1.22 (95 % CI 1.02-1.45), and 1.40 (95 % CI 1.01-1.95), respectively. Weight gain was not significantly associated with survival in men. Maintaining a healthy weight may benefit CRC survival, at least in women.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 20 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 20 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 5 25%
Student > Master 4 20%
Student > Bachelor 3 15%
Librarian 1 5%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 5%
Other 3 15%
Unknown 3 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 50%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 10%
Psychology 1 5%
Mathematics 1 5%
Engineering 1 5%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 5 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 July 2016.
All research outputs
#6,977,726
of 8,058,126 outputs
Outputs from BMC Cancer
#2,802
of 3,434 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#217,784
of 258,852 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Cancer
#176
of 234 outputs
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We're also able to compare this research output to 234 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.