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Ethnobotany of the Samburu of Mt. Nyiru, South Turkana, Kenya

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, September 2006
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Title
Ethnobotany of the Samburu of Mt. Nyiru, South Turkana, Kenya
Published in
Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, September 2006
DOI 10.1186/1746-4269-2-35
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rainer W Bussmann

Abstract

Traditional plant use is of extremely high importance in many societies, and prevalent in African communities. This knowledge is however dwindling rapidly due to changes towards a more Western lifestyle. The influence of modern tourism cannot be neglected in this context. This paper examines the plant use of the Samburu of the Mt. Nyiru area in Northern Kenya. The Samburu pastoralists of Kenya are still amongst the most traditional communities of the country and have retained most of their knowledge about the use of a large part of the plants in their environment for a wide variety of purposes. The results indicate that the local population has a very high knowledge of the plants in their surroundings, and attributes a purpose to a large percentage of the plants found. 448 plant species were collected, identified and their Samburu names and traditional uses recorded. 199 species were reported as of "no use". The high proportion of 249 plant species however had some traditional use: The highest number (180 species) was used as fodder, followed by 80 species that had medicinal use. Firewood (59 species), construction (42 species), tools (31 species), food (29 species) and ceremonial use (19 species) ranked far behind. Traditionally the Samburu attribute most illnesses to the effect of pollutants that block or inhibit digestion. This can include "polluted" food, contagion through sick people as well as witchcraft. In most cases the treatment of illness involves herbal purgatives to cleanse the patient. There are however frequent indications of plant use for common problems like wounds, parasites, body aches and burns. The change from a nomadic to a more sedentary lifestyle, often observed in other areas of the country, has affected the Samburu of remote Mt. Nyiru to a much lesser extent and did so far not lead to a major loss of traditional plant knowledge. However, overgrazing and over-exploitation of plant resources have already led to a decline of the plant material available.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 116 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 <1%
Tanzania, United Republic of 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Kenya 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Argentina 1 <1%
Unknown 110 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 24 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 14%
Researcher 14 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 7%
Student > Bachelor 8 7%
Other 32 28%
Unknown 14 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 34 29%
Environmental Science 15 13%
Social Sciences 13 11%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 8 7%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 6%
Other 18 16%
Unknown 21 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 October 2021.
All research outputs
#16,716,229
of 21,457,683 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine
#572
of 703 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#110,778
of 151,901 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,457,683 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 703 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.3. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 151,901 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them