↓ Skip to main content

Risk factors for an acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

Overview of attention for article published in Respiratory Research, July 2016
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (82nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
16 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
30 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
69 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Risk factors for an acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis
Published in
Respiratory Research, July 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12931-016-0400-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tomoyuki Kakugawa, Noriho Sakamoto, Shuntaro Sato, Hirokazu Yura, Tatsuhiko Harada, Shota Nakashima, Atsuko Hara, Keishi Oda, Hiroshi Ishimoto, Kazuhiro Yatera, Yuji Ishimatsu, Yasushi Obase, Shigeru Kohno, Hiroshi Mukae

Abstract

Acute exacerbations of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis are major causes of morbidity and mortality among patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. However, acute exacerbations remain unpredictable. The aim of this study was to investigate risk factors for acute exacerbations of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. We performed a retrospective cohort study of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis who visited our institutions from January 1999 to September 2014. We investigated risk factors for acute exacerbations in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis diagnosed retrospectively based on the official 2011 idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis ATS/ERS/JRS/ALAT Update Statement. The idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis study cohort included 65 subjects. The median follow-up period was 2.6 years. During follow-up, 24 patients (36.9 %) experienced acute exacerbations. A Kaplan-Meier curve demonstrated that the 1-year, 2-year, and 3-year incidences of acute exacerbation were 9.6, 19.2 and 31.0 %, respectively. Acute exacerbation exerted a significant impact on overall survival among those with the disease. A log-rank test showed that baseline cardiovascular diseases, higher GAP (gender, age, physiology) stage (≥II), higher serum lactate dehydrogenase level (≥180 U/L), higher serum surfactant protein-D level (≥194.7 ng/mL), higher neutrophil (≥1.77 %) and eosinophil (≥3.21 %) percentages in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples, and treatment with an immunosuppressive agent after diagnosis were associated with poor acute exacerbation-free probability. In the Cox analysis adjusted for treatment with an immunosuppressive agent, baseline cardiovascular diseases, higher GAP stage (≥II), and higher eosinophil percentage (≥3.21 %) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples were predictors of an acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. This study demonstrated that baseline cardiovascular diseases, higher GAP stage (≥II), and higher eosinophil percentage (≥3.21 %) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples were associated with the onset of an acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 16 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 69 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 69 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 17 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 10%
Other 7 10%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 7%
Student > Bachelor 5 7%
Other 17 25%
Unknown 11 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 38 55%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 4%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 3%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 3%
Other 7 10%
Unknown 13 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 September 2016.
All research outputs
#1,853,197
of 14,394,544 outputs
Outputs from Respiratory Research
#213
of 1,791 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#45,006
of 259,341 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Respiratory Research
#1
of 20 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,394,544 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 87th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,791 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 259,341 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 20 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.