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A qualitative study of online mental health information seeking behaviour by those with psychosis

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Psychiatry, July 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
76 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
58 Dimensions

Readers on

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231 Mendeley
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Title
A qualitative study of online mental health information seeking behaviour by those with psychosis
Published in
BMC Psychiatry, July 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12888-016-0952-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Golnar Aref-Adib, Puffin O’Hanlon, Kate Fullarton, Nicola Morant, Andrew Sommerlad, Sonia Johnson, David Osborn

Abstract

The Internet and mobile technology are changing the way people learn about and manage their illnesses. Little is known about online mental health information seeking behaviour by people with psychosis. This paper explores the nature, extent and consequences of online mental health information seeking behaviour by people with psychosis and investigates the acceptability of a mobile mental health application (app). Semi-structured interviews were carried out with people with psychosis (n = 22). Participants were purposively recruited through secondary care settings in London. The main topics discussed were participants' current and historical use of online mental health information and technology. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed and analysed by a team of researchers using thematic analysis. Mental health related Internet use was widespread. Eighteen people described searching the Internet to help them make sense of their psychotic experiences, and to read more information about their diagnosis, their prescribed psychiatric medication and its side-effects. Whilst some participants sought 'expert' online information from mental health clinicians and research journals, others described actively seeking first person perspectives. Eight participants used this information collaboratively with clinicians and spoke of the empowerment and independence the Internet offered them. However nine participants did not discuss their use of online mental health information with their clinicians for a number of reasons, including fear of undermining their clinician's authority. For some of these people concerns over what they had read led them to discontinue their antipsychotic medication without discussion with their mental health team. People with psychosis use the Internet to acquire mental health related information. This can be a helpful source of supplementary information particularly for those who use it collaboratively with clinicians. When this information is not shared with their mental health team, it can affect patients' health care decisions. A partnership approach to online health-information seeking is needed, with mental health clinicians encouraging patients to discuss information they have found online as part of a shared decision-making process. Our research suggests that those with psychosis have active digital lives and that the introduction of a mental health app into services would potentially be well received.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 76 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 231 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 228 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 41 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 34 15%
Researcher 22 10%
Student > Bachelor 20 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 15 6%
Other 47 20%
Unknown 52 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 60 26%
Medicine and Dentistry 32 14%
Social Sciences 23 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 18 8%
Business, Management and Accounting 8 3%
Other 28 12%
Unknown 62 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 54. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 March 2017.
All research outputs
#631,122
of 22,113,391 outputs
Outputs from BMC Psychiatry
#150
of 4,515 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#12,187
of 274,301 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Psychiatry
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,113,391 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,515 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 274,301 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them