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Implementation of repeat HIV testing during pregnancy in Kenya: a qualitative study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, July 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (67th percentile)

Mentioned by

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7 tweeters
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2 Facebook pages

Citations

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22 Dimensions

Readers on

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196 Mendeley
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Title
Implementation of repeat HIV testing during pregnancy in Kenya: a qualitative study
Published in
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, July 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12884-016-0936-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anna Joy Rogers, Elly Weke, Zachary Kwena, Elizabeth A. Bukusi, Patrick Oyaro, Craig R. Cohen, Janet M. Turan

Abstract

Repeat HIV testing in late pregnancy has the potential to decrease rates of mother-to-child transmission of HIV by identifying mothers who seroconvert after having tested negative for HIV in early pregnancy. Despite being national policy in Kenya, the available data suggest that implementation rates are low. We conducted 20 in-depth semi-structured interviews with healthcare providers and managers to explore barriers and enablers to implementation of repeat HIV testing guidelines for pregnant women. Participants were from the Nyanza region of Kenya and were purposively selected to provide variation in socio-demographics and job characteristics. Interview transcripts were coded and analyzed in Dedoose software using a thematic analysis approach. Four themes were identified a priori using Ferlie and Shortell's Framework for Change and additional themes were allowed to emerge from the data. Participants identified barriers and enablers at the client, provider, facility, and health system levels. Key barriers at the client level from the perspective of providers included late initial presentation to antenatal care and low proportions of women completing the recommended four antenatal visits. Barriers to offering repeat HIV testing for providers included heavy workloads, time limitations, and failing to remember to check for retest eligibility. At the facility level, inconsistent volume of clients and lack of space required for confidential HIV retesting were cited as barriers. Finally, at the health system level, there were challenges relating to the HIV test kit supply chain and the design of nationally standardized antenatal patient registers. Enablers to improving the implementation of repeat HIV testing included client dissemination of the benefits of antenatal care through word-of-mouth, provider cooperation and task shifting, and it was suggested that use of an electronic health record system could provide automatic reminders for retest eligibility. This study highlights some important barriers to improving HIV retesting rates among pregnant women who attend antenatal clinics in the Nyanza region of Kenya at the client, provider, facility, and health system levels. To successfully implement Kenya's national repeat HIV testing guidelines during pregnancy, it is essential that these barriers be addressed and enablers capitalized on through a multi-faceted intervention program.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 196 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Unknown 195 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 50 26%
Researcher 28 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 9%
Student > Postgraduate 15 8%
Student > Bachelor 12 6%
Other 30 15%
Unknown 43 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 43 22%
Nursing and Health Professions 37 19%
Social Sciences 19 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 4%
Psychology 6 3%
Other 31 16%
Unknown 53 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 October 2016.
All research outputs
#5,994,564
of 20,023,934 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#1,682
of 3,597 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#86,675
of 270,489 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,023,934 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 69th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,597 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,489 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them