↓ Skip to main content

High prevalence of extended-spectrum ß-lactamase producing enterobacteriaceae among clinical isolates in Burkina Faso

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, July 2016
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
55 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
126 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
High prevalence of extended-spectrum ß-lactamase producing enterobacteriaceae among clinical isolates in Burkina Faso
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, July 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12879-016-1655-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Abdoul-Salam Ouedraogo, Mahamadou Sanou, Aimée Kissou, Soufiane Sanou, Hermann Solaré, Firmin Kaboré, Armel Poda, Salim Aberkane, Nicolas Bouzinbi, Idrissa Sano, Boubacar Nacro, Lassana Sangaré, Christian Carrière, Dominique Decré, Rasmata Ouégraogo, Hélène Jean-Pierre, Sylvain Godreuil

Abstract

Nothing is known about the epidemiology and resistance mechanisms of extended-spectrum ß-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-PE) in Burkina Faso. The objective of this study was to determine ESBL-PE prevalence and to characterize ESBL genes in Burkina Faso. During 2 months (June-July 2014), 1602 clinical samples were sent for bacteriologic investigations to the microbiology laboratories of the tree main hospitals of Burkina Faso. Isolates were identified by mass spectrometry using a matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) BioTyper. Antibiotic susceptibility was tested using the disk diffusion method on Müller-Hinton agar. The different ESBL genes in potential ESBL-producing isolates were detected by PCR and double stranded DNA sequencing. Escherichia coli phylogenetic groups were determined using a PCR-based method. ESBL-PE frequency was 58 % (179 strains among the 308 Enterobacteriaceae isolates identified in the collected samples; 45 % in outpatients and 70 % in hospitalized patients). The CTX-M-1 group was dominant (94 %, CTX-M-15 enzyme), followed by the CTX-M-9 group (4 %). ESBL producers were more often found in E. coli (67.5 %) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (26 %) isolates. E. coli isolates (n = 202; 60 % of all Enterobacteriaceae samples) were distributed in eight phylogenetic groups (A = 49, B1 = 15, B2 = 43, C = 22, Clade I = 7, D = 37, F = 13 and 16 unknown); 22 strains belonged to the sequence type ST131. No association between a specific strain and ESBL production was detected. This report shows the alarming spread of ESBL genes in Burkina Faso. Public health efforts should focus on education (population and healthcare professionals), surveillance and promotion of correct and restricted antibiotic use to limit their dissemination.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 126 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 <1%
Unknown 125 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 28 22%
Student > Postgraduate 17 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 10%
Student > Bachelor 11 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 8%
Other 23 18%
Unknown 25 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Immunology and Microbiology 28 22%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 18 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 15 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 14 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 5%
Other 13 10%
Unknown 32 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 July 2016.
All research outputs
#4,266,874
of 8,071,125 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#2,098
of 3,654 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#141,323
of 258,679 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#99
of 188 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,071,125 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,654 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.9. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 258,679 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 188 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.