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The effect of the kindergarten barefoot policy on preschool children’s toes

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Physiological Anthropology, January 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#33 of 179)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (86th percentile)

Mentioned by

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17 tweeters
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4 Facebook pages

Citations

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4 Dimensions

Readers on

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33 Mendeley
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Title
The effect of the kindergarten barefoot policy on preschool children’s toes
Published in
Journal of Physiological Anthropology, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s40101-016-0097-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Shigeki Matsuda, Kosho Kasuga, Tadayuki Hanai, Tomohiro Demura, Keisuke Komura

Abstract

This study compared the effects of barefoot policy, a policy instructing preschool children to go without shoes, on untouched-toes, which do not touch the ground while standing normally, of preschool children attending kindergartens that follow this rule, to preschooler in kindergartens where they must wear shoes, i.e., no-barefoot policy. The study used longitudinal data from measurements taken 2 years apart of the amount of times. The subjects were 59 children (34 boys and 25 girls) who went to a kindergarten that followed barefoot policy and 179 children (103 boys and 76 girls) who went to a kindergarten that did not follow barefoot policy. Images were taken of the contact surface area of the soles of the children's feet by having them stand on the measurement device with their bare feet. The number of untouched-toes in children participating in the study was determined from the pictures. In boys who attended kindergartens following barefoot policy, the ratio of the children without untouched-toes significantly increased for 2 years of childhood (35.3-64.7 %). The number of untouched-toes were significantly fewer in boys from kindergartens following barefoot policy than in boys from kindergartens not following the policy, and the magnitude of the difference grew for the two study years (ES: 0.41-0.63). In girls, there were no significant differences between the two groups in the ratio of girls without untouched-toes and the number of untouched-toes. In conclusion, the ground contact of the toes becomes better for boys in kindergarten with a barefoot policy. The results were inconclusive with regard to girls, and other factors may need to be examined. In the future, it will be necessary to increase the number of the subjects and perform detailed examinations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 17 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 33 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
China 1 3%
Unknown 32 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 10 30%
Student > Master 7 21%
Other 3 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 6%
Student > Postgraduate 2 6%
Other 4 12%
Unknown 5 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 7 21%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 15%
Social Sciences 2 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 3%
Other 5 15%
Unknown 6 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 August 2016.
All research outputs
#1,288,570
of 13,318,687 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Physiological Anthropology
#33
of 179 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#34,295
of 259,742 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Physiological Anthropology
#1
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,318,687 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 179 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 259,742 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them