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The emergence of semantic categorization in early visual processing: ERP indices of animal vs. artifact recognition

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Neuroscience, April 2007
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Title
The emergence of semantic categorization in early visual processing: ERP indices of animal vs. artifact recognition
Published in
BMC Neuroscience, April 2007
DOI 10.1186/1471-2202-8-24
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alice M Proverbio, Marzia Del Zotto, Alberto Zani

Abstract

Neuroimaging and neuropsychological literature show functional dissociations in brain activity during processing of stimuli belonging to different semantic categories (e.g., animals, tools, faces, places), but little information is available about the time course of object perceptual categorization. The aim of the study was to provide information about the timing of processing stimuli from different semantic domains, without using verbal or naming paradigms, in order to observe the emergence of non-linguistic conceptual knowledge in the ventral stream visual pathway. Event related potentials (ERPs) were recorded in 18 healthy right-handed individuals as they performed a perceptual categorization task on 672 pairs of images of animals and man-made objects (i.e., artifacts).

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 122 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 3 2%
United Kingdom 3 2%
United States 3 2%
Italy 2 2%
Belgium 2 2%
Canada 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Russia 1 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 105 86%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 24 20%
Student > Master 23 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 22 18%
Student > Bachelor 10 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 7%
Other 27 22%
Unknown 7 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 67 55%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 7%
Neuroscience 8 7%
Engineering 5 4%
Linguistics 5 4%
Other 16 13%
Unknown 12 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 October 2012.
All research outputs
#3,081,581
of 4,507,072 outputs
Outputs from BMC Neuroscience
#464
of 640 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#51,938
of 79,970 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Neuroscience
#17
of 24 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 640 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.9. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 24 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.