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CMR of microvascular obstruction and hemorrhage in myocardial infarction

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (Taylor & Francis Ltd), September 2012
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1 tweeter

Citations

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118 Dimensions

Readers on

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157 Mendeley
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2 CiteULike
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Title
CMR of microvascular obstruction and hemorrhage in myocardial infarction
Published in
Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (Taylor & Francis Ltd), September 2012
DOI 10.1186/1532-429x-14-68
Pubmed ID
Authors

Katherine C Wu

Abstract

Microvascular obstruction (MO) or no-reflow phenomenon is an established complication of coronary reperfusion therapy for acute myocardial infarction. It is increasingly recognized as a poor prognostic indicator and marker of subsequent adverse LV remodeling. Although MO can be assessed using various imaging modalities including electrocardiography, myocardial contrast echocardiography, nuclear scintigraphy, and coronary angiography, evaluation by cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is particularly useful in enhancing its detection, diagnosis, and quantification, as well as following its subsequent effects on infarct evolution and healing. MO assessment has become a routine component of the CMR evaluation of acute myocardial infarction and will increasingly play a role in clinical trials of adjunctive reperfusion agents and strategies. This review will summarize the pathophysiology of MO, current CMR approaches to diagnosis, clinical implications, and future directions needed for improving our understanding of this common clinical problem.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 157 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 1%
Spain 2 1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Czechia 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Unknown 150 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 35 22%
Other 25 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 20 13%
Student > Master 12 8%
Student > Postgraduate 12 8%
Other 35 22%
Unknown 18 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 105 67%
Engineering 6 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 3%
Physics and Astronomy 3 2%
Unspecified 2 1%
Other 5 3%
Unknown 31 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 October 2012.
All research outputs
#2,898,439
of 3,631,967 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (Taylor & Francis Ltd)
#182
of 299 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#56,657
of 76,502 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (Taylor & Francis Ltd)
#4
of 18 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 3,631,967 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 2nd percentile – i.e., 2% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 299 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.5. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 76,502 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 18 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.