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Treatment-associated polymorphisms in protease are significantly associated with higher viral load and lower CD4 count in newly diagnosed drug-naive HIV-1 infected patients

Overview of attention for article published in Retrovirology, October 2012
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Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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28 Dimensions

Readers on

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81 Mendeley
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Title
Treatment-associated polymorphisms in protease are significantly associated with higher viral load and lower CD4 count in newly diagnosed drug-naive HIV-1 infected patients
Published in
Retrovirology, October 2012
DOI 10.1186/1742-4690-9-81
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kristof Theys, Koen Deforche, Jurgen Vercauteren, Pieter Libin, David AMC van de Vijver, Jan Albert, Birgitta Åsjö, Claudia Balotta, Marie Bruckova, Ricardo J Camacho, Bonaventura Clotet, Suzie Coughlan, Zehava Grossman, Osamah Hamouda, Andrzei Horban, Klaus Korn, Leondios G Kostrikis, Claudia Kücherer, Claus Nielsen, Dimitrios Paraskevis, Mario Poljak, Elisabeth Puchhammer-Stockl, Chiara Riva, Lidia Ruiz, Kirsi Liitsola, Jean-Claude Schmit, Rob Schuurman, Anders Sönnerborg, Danica Stanekova, Maja Stanojevic, Daniel Struck, Kristel Van Laethem, Annemarie MJ Wensing, Charles AB Boucher, Anne-Mieke Vandamme

Abstract

The effect of drug resistance transmission on disease progression in the newly infected patient is not well understood. Major drug resistance mutations severely impair viral fitness in a drug free environment, and therefore are expected to revert quickly. Compensatory mutations, often already polymorphic in wild-type viruses, do not tend to revert after transmission. While compensatory mutations increase fitness during treatment, their presence may also modulate viral fitness and virulence in absence of therapy and major resistance mutations. We previously designed a modeling technique that quantifies genotypic footprints of in vivo treatment selective pressure, including both drug resistance mutations and polymorphic compensatory mutations, through the quantitative description of a fitness landscape from virus genetic sequences.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 81 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
India 2 2%
Tanzania, United Republic of 1 1%
Hungary 1 1%
Kenya 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Unknown 75 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 14 17%
Professor > Associate Professor 11 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 12%
Student > Master 7 9%
Other 5 6%
Other 14 17%
Unknown 20 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 18 22%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 15%
Immunology and Microbiology 8 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 7%
Computer Science 6 7%
Other 5 6%
Unknown 26 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 October 2012.
All research outputs
#7,502,501
of 12,445,334 outputs
Outputs from Retrovirology
#423
of 683 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#67,457
of 128,113 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Retrovirology
#2
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,445,334 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 683 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.7. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 128,113 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.