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Aerobic exercise training protects against endothelial dysfunction by increasing nitric oxide and hydrogen peroxide production in LDL receptor-deficient mice

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Translational Medicine, July 2016
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Title
Aerobic exercise training protects against endothelial dysfunction by increasing nitric oxide and hydrogen peroxide production in LDL receptor-deficient mice
Published in
Journal of Translational Medicine, July 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12967-016-0972-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Daniele M. Guizoni, Gabriel G. Dorighello, Helena C. F. Oliveira, Maria A. Delbin, Marta H. Krieger, Ana P. Davel

Abstract

Endothelial dysfunction associated with hypercholesterolemia is an early event in atherosclerosis characterized by redox imbalance associated with high superoxide production and reduced nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production. Aerobic exercise training (AET) has been demonstrated to ameliorate atherosclerotic lesions and oxidative stress in advanced atherosclerosis. However, whether AET protects against the early mechanisms of endothelial dysfunction in familial hypercholesterolemia remains unclear. This study investigated the effects of AET on endothelial dysfunction and vascular redox status in the aortas of LDL receptor knockout mice (LDLr(-/-)), a genetic model of familial hypercholesterolemia. Twelve-week-old C57BL/6J (WT) and LDLr(-/-) mice were divided into sedentary and exercised (AET on a treadmill 1 h/5 × per week) groups for 4 weeks. Changes in lipid profiles, endothelial function, and aortic NO, H2O2 and superoxide production were examined. Total cholesterol and triglycerides were increased in sedentary and exercised LDLr(-/-) mice. Endothelium-dependent relaxation induced by acetylcholine was impaired in aortas of sedentary LDLr(-/-) mice but not in the exercised group. Inhibition of NO synthase (NOS) activity or H2O2 decomposition by catalase abolished the differences in the acetylcholine response between the animals. No changes were noted in the relaxation response induced by NO donor sodium nitroprusside or H2O2. Neuronal NOS expression and endothelial NOS phosphorylation (Ser1177), as well as NO and H2O2 production, were reduced in aortas of sedentary LDLr(-/-) mice and restored by AET. Incubation with apocynin increased acetylcholine-induced relaxation in sedentary, but not exercised LDLr(-/-) mice, suggesting a minor participation of NADPH oxidase in the endothelium-dependent relaxation after AET. Consistent with these findings, Nox2 expression and superoxide production were reduced in the aortas of exercised compared to sedentary LDLr(-/-) mice. Furthermore, the aortas of sedentary LDLr(-/-) mice showed reduced expression of superoxide dismutase (SOD) isoforms and minor participation of Cu/Zn-dependent SODs in acetylcholine-induced, endothelium-dependent relaxation, abnormalities that were partially attenuated in exercised LDLr(-/-) mice. The data gathered by this study suggest AET as a potential non-pharmacological therapy in the prevention of very early endothelial dysfunction and redox imbalance in familial hypercholesterolemia via increases in NO bioavailability and H2O2 production.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 47 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 47 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 5 11%
Student > Master 5 11%
Student > Bachelor 5 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 6%
Other 2 4%
Other 8 17%
Unknown 19 40%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 9%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 6%
Sports and Recreations 3 6%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 4%
Other 9 19%
Unknown 22 47%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 October 2017.
All research outputs
#14,206,604
of 18,467,202 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Translational Medicine
#2,491
of 3,337 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#181,268
of 272,885 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Translational Medicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,467,202 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,337 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.3. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 272,885 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them