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BAT117213: Ileal bile acid transporter (IBAT) inhibition as a treatment for pruritus in primary biliary cirrhosis: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Gastroenterology, July 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (68th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (56th percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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24 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
54 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
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Title
BAT117213: Ileal bile acid transporter (IBAT) inhibition as a treatment for pruritus in primary biliary cirrhosis: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial
Published in
BMC Gastroenterology, July 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12876-016-0481-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Vinod S. Hegade, Stuart F. W. Kendrick, Robert L. Dobbins, Sam R. Miller, Duncan Richards, James Storey, George Dukes, Kim Gilchrist, Susan Vallow, Graeme J. Alexander, Margaret Corrigan, Gideon M. Hirschfield, David E. J. Jones

Abstract

Pruritus (itch) is a symptom commonly experienced by patients with cholestatic liver diseases such as primary biliary cholangitis (PBC, previously referred to as primary biliary cirrhosis). Bile acids (BAs) have been proposed as potential pruritogens in PBC. The ileal bile acid transporter (IBAT) protein expressed in the distal ileum plays a key role in the enterohepatic circulation of BAs. Pharmacological inhibition of IBAT with GSK2330672 may reduce BA levels in the systemic circulation and improve pruritus. This clinical study (BAT117213 study) is sponsored by GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) with associated exploratory studies supported by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR). It is a phase 2a, multi-centre, randomised, double bind, placebo controlled, cross-over trial for PBC patients with pruritus. The primary objective is to investigate the safety and tolerability of repeat doses of GSK2330672, and explore whether GSK2330672 administration for 14 days improves pruritus compared with placebo. The key outcomes include improvement in pruritus scores evaluated on a numerical rating scale and other PBC symptoms in an electronic diary completed twice daily by the patients. The secondary outcomes include the evaluation of the effect of GSK2330672 on total serum bile acid (BA) concentrations, serum markers of BA synthesis and steady-state pharmacokinetics of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA). BAT117213 study is the first randomised controlled crossover trial of ileal bile acid transporter inhibitor, a novel class of drug to treat pruritus in PBC. The main strengths of the trial are utility of a novel, study specific, electronic symptom diary as patient reported outcome to measure the treatment response objectively and the crossover design that allows estimating the treatment effect in a smaller number of patients. The outcome of this trial will inform the trial design of future development phase of the IBAT inhibitor drug. The trial will also provide opportunity to conduct metabonomic and gut microbiome studies as explorative and mechanistic research in patients with cholestatic pruritus. EudraCT number: 2012-005531-84, ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01899703 , registered on 3(rd) July 2013.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 54 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 2%
Unknown 53 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 8 15%
Student > Master 7 13%
Researcher 6 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 11%
Student > Postgraduate 5 9%
Other 13 24%
Unknown 9 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 26 48%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 4 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 4%
Other 4 7%
Unknown 10 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 August 2016.
All research outputs
#1,962,441
of 8,166,192 outputs
Outputs from BMC Gastroenterology
#143
of 693 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#79,470
of 258,400 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Gastroenterology
#11
of 25 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,166,192 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 75th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 693 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 258,400 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 25 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.