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Nerve growth factor: role in growth, differentiation and controlling cancer cell development

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Experimental & Clinical Cancer Research, July 2016
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Title
Nerve growth factor: role in growth, differentiation and controlling cancer cell development
Published in
Journal of Experimental & Clinical Cancer Research, July 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13046-016-0395-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Luigi Aloe, Maria Luisa Rocco, Bijorn Omar Balzamino, Alessandra Micera

Abstract

Recent progress in the Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) research has shown that this factor acts not only outside its classical domain of the peripheral and central nervous system, but also on non-neuronal and cancer cells. This latter observation has led to divergent hypothesis about the role of NGF, its specific distribution pattern within the tissues and its implication in induction as well as progression of carcinogenesis. Moreover, other recent studies have shown that NGF has direct clinical relevance in certain human brain neuron degeneration and a number of human ocular disorders. These studies, by suggesting that NGF is involved in a plethora of physiological function in health and disease, warrant further investigation regarding the true role of NGF in carcinogenesis. Based on our long-lasting experience in the physiopathology of NGF, we aimed to review previous and recent in vivo and in vitro NGF studies on tumor cell induction, progression and arrest. Overall, these studies indicate that the only presence of NGF is unable to generate cell carcinogenesis, both in normal neuronal and non-neuronal cells/tissues. However, it cannot be excluded the possibility that the co-expression of NGF and pro-carcinogenic molecules might open to different consequence. Whether NGF plays a direct or an indirect role in cell proliferation during carcinogenesis remains to demonstrate.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 67 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 67 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 11 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 16%
Student > Master 9 13%
Researcher 9 13%
Other 6 9%
Other 12 18%
Unknown 9 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 15 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 11 16%
Neuroscience 10 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 12%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 4%
Other 9 13%
Unknown 11 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 March 2018.
All research outputs
#10,154,829
of 12,706,057 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Experimental & Clinical Cancer Research
#437
of 796 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#185,059
of 262,428 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Experimental & Clinical Cancer Research
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,706,057 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 796 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.5. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them